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I am studying reference of c++, and now I am quite confused by the difference between variable name and reference. The test code is below:

class TestClass{
private:
    int num;
public:
    TestClass(int n):num(n){
        cout<<this<<" : init of : " <<this->num<<endl;
    }

    TestClass(const TestClass& t):num(t.num){
        cout<<this<<" : copyInit of : " <<this->num<<endl;
    }

};

int main(int argc, const char * argv[]){

    TestClass t = *(new TestClass(55)); //just to test copy initialization

    const TestClass t2 = TestClass(100); //option1
    const TestClass &t2 = TestClass(100); //option2


}

So now I have two options in making object, which are exclusive with each other.

In my understanding, if I use options2, the compiler makes a temporary object in the stack memory and returns the reference value to t2.

If this is right, how can I verbalize or explain the option1? It seems that the same object is created in the stack memory and computer gives a name 't2' to that object, but I do not clearly understand how this option1 is different with the option2 because a name of variables and reference are somewhat confusing.

In addition, switching options alternatively, I could see that the objects are created in different memory locations in each case. (e.g. the object of option1 was created in 0x7fff5fbff828, and that or option2 was in 0x7fff5fbff820)

Could you please explain

1. what's the difference between a variable name(option1) and reference(option2).

2. how things work differently in option 1 and 2.

3. why objects are created in different memory location in either cases.

In advance, thanks for your help!

share|improve this question
    
I would attempt an answer at this question but your 3rd question confuses me... does the code compile? –  Lews Therin Nov 3 '12 at 23:28
    
@LewsTherin If you rename the first option, it compiles. –  Olaf Dietsche Nov 3 '12 at 23:29
    
Note that in TestClass t = *(new TestClass(55)); you no longer can delete the allocated memory. –  Jesse Good Nov 3 '12 at 23:30
    
@OlafDietsche Ah kwl. –  Lews Therin Nov 3 '12 at 23:31
    
@ Lews Therin Oh, I did not build the code having both line. I tested each option separately, commenting out the other one. But the thing is everytime I tested option1, the object is created in the memory spot A, and was created in memory spot B with the option2. –  noclew Nov 3 '12 at 23:32
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

1)what's the difference between a variable name(option1) and reference(option2).

Name has static type. Reference can be bind to derived classes - we do not know the exact type of referred objects.

In your very example - for option 2 - you extended the lifetime of temporary object by creating const reference to it - see http://herbsutter.com/2008/01/01/gotw-88-a-candidate-for-the-most-important-const/

Normally, a temporary object lasts only until the end of the full expression in which it appears. However, C++ deliberately specifies that binding a temporary object to a reference to const on the stack lengthens the lifetime of the temporary to the lifetime of the reference itself, and thus avoids what would otherwise be a common dangling-reference error.


2)how things work differently in option 1 and 2.

If you call virtual function - then for variable name you know which function will be called, for references - you cannot know in more complicated example than yours.


3)why objects are created in different memory location in either cases.

They are different objects, they life in the same time - so why their memory location should be identical?

Other difference is that for option 1 you created automatic variable, for option 2 it is temporary variable - both might use different memory (stack vs. registers or some reserved memory just for temporaries)


Consider more complicated example:

class TestClass{
protected:
    int num;
public:
    TestClass(int n):num(n){
        cout<<this<<" : init of : " <<this->num<<endl;
    }
    TestClass(const TestClass& t):num(t.num){
        cout<<this<<" : copyInit of : " <<this->num<<endl;
    }
    virtual void printNum () const { cout << "NUM: " << num << endl; }
};

class TestClassDerived : public TestClass {
public:
    TestClassDerived(int n):TestClass(n){}
    virtual void printNum () const { cout << "DERIVED NUM: " << num << endl; }
};


int main(int argc, const char * argv[]){
    const TestClass t1 = TestClass(100); //option1
    const TestClass &t2 = TestClassDerived(100); //option2
    t1.printNum();
    t2.printNum();
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for ellison :) –  Caribou Nov 4 '12 at 0:09
2  
@noclew - for 1: Your assignment from derived object is called slicing. t2 is of type declared on the left - it only copies the base part from TestClassDerived(100) - in general you should avoid it: more details: stackoverflow.com/questions/274626/… –  PiotrNycz Nov 4 '12 at 0:59
1  
@noclew - for 2: YES, you understand it exactly. Consider this: void foo(TestClass& t); TestClassDerived d(100); foo(d); - when you write implementation of foo - you do not know the most derived type of its argument. –  PiotrNycz Nov 4 '12 at 1:02
1  
@noclew good point. & is not only the way of representing the object. TestClass(100) is created in so called temporary memory. It could some RAM or registers - anything - compiler decides where it is. When inside function TestClass t(100); creates automatic variable - it is on the stack in every compiler I know. So there are two distinct memories - so the difference. This code: const TestClass& t = TestClass(100); - just extends the lifetime of temporary TestClass(100) to the lifetime of the const reference. –  PiotrNycz Nov 4 '12 at 1:19
1  
@noclew - maybe that non const references does not extend lifetime of an temporary object. There are probably many things to remember - I am thinking about references as something between pointers and "variable names"... You might find this helpful: stackoverflow.com/questions/57483/… –  PiotrNycz Nov 4 '12 at 2:05
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const TestClass t2 = TestClass(100); //option1
const TestClass &t2 = TestClass(100); //option2

Option1:

calls the copy constructor of TestClass and passes in the temporary created on the right hand side of the "=". Copy elision eliminates unnecessary copying of objects (See Piotrs coment below).

Option 2:

You create 1 object, the temporary, which becomes bound to the reference.

  1. what's the difference between a variable name(option1) and reference(option2).

edit: I didn't know this before, but in actual fact there is not a second allocation in option 1 (Thanks Piotr) this is due to copy elision which refers to a compiler optimization technique that eliminates unnecessary copying of objects.

To use your words, the "variable name" is a block of memory that contains data. The reference is like a pointer in the sense that it points to another "variable name", but it must be initialised, and is never null.

  1. how things work differently in option 1 and 2.

As Others have said option 1 is a static type, where as option 2 could point to an instance of a derived (from TestClass) object.

  1. why objects are created in different memory location in either cases.

Despite being "identical" TestObjects(100) they are individual instances and therefore in different memory (addresses)

share|improve this answer
    
Can you demonstrate how the object in option 1 can be changed? It looks const to me. –  Beta Nov 3 '12 at 23:36
    
@Beta ahemm... :| i'll edit –  Caribou Nov 3 '12 at 23:37
    
Any proof that extra allocation occured in option1? See my example at ideone: ideone.com/VJiVLf. No extra allocation... –  PiotrNycz Nov 3 '12 at 23:45
    
@PiotrNycz Interesting thats not what I expected as I wrote. Is it optimised out becuase of the const object? –  Caribou Nov 3 '12 at 23:50
1  
It's funny I would have just jumped in an answered yes before this question, but now I find myself questioning everything I thought was true. To use your words, the "variable name" is a block of memory that contains data. The reference is like a pointer in the sense that it points to another "variable name", but it must be initialised, and is never null –  Caribou Nov 4 '12 at 1:28
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