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Well I have a structure and two functions, in one of the functions I am using the structures to perform some check and I want to call that function in another function, so when some action is taken in that function, the other can do the check. Let's say object ball goes up, perform the check before it does another move. I know you can call functions in another function, however I cannot call it the way I call other functions with variables int for example, I imagine because of the structure. How can I call that checker function in the display function? Thanks in advance!

 struct box{
    //code
    };

    void checker(box A, box B, box C, box D, box E, box Q){
    /*Creating struct of type boxes here and statements to cheack if any of the limits between    them   intersect each other*/
    }

    void display(){
    //Displaying the objects here that are inside the structure box to check collision
    }
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Thomas Matthews, SingerOfTheFall, Benjamin Bannier, Andrey, Graviton Nov 28 '12 at 4:57

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
What is your question? – Olaf Dietsche Nov 4 '12 at 0:11
    
How can I call that checker function in display function – Vico Pelaez Nov 4 '12 at 0:13

Like this?

void display()
{
    box A, B, C, D, E, Q;
    // ...
    checker(A, B, C, D, E, Q);
    // ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
I tried it it tells me A is an undeclared identifier A – Vico Pelaez Nov 4 '12 at 0:15
    
Can you post your actual code? Here, A is clearly declared. – ezod Nov 4 '12 at 0:17

Do you want to know how to pass arguments?

You seem to be new to C++. You may want to read a little about functions.

Functions (I) On Cplusplus

Functions (II) On Cplusplus

struct box{
//code
}; //forgot semicolon

void checker(box A, box B, box C, box D, box E, box Q){
//code
}

void display() //forgot parenthesis 
{
    box A, B, C, D, E, Q;

    //initialize and use variables.

    //call function...
    checker(A, B, C, D, E, Q);
}

It's hard to tell what exactly you are asking.

An idea.

Maybe you want something like this (taking a wild guess here. Mostly just showing you one scenario.):

class Box
{
//code
};

class GameState
{
    public:
        GameState(map<std::string, Box> _boxes);
        void display();
        void moveBox(std::string boxID, int x, int y);
    private:
        bool checkMove(std::string boxID, int x, int y);

        std::map<std::string, Box> boxes;
};

void mainLoop()
{
    map<string, Box> boxes;
    boxes["A"] = Box();
    boxes["B"] = Box();
    boxes["C"] = Box();
    boxes["D"] = Box();
    boxes["E"] = Box();
    boxes["Q"] = Box();

    bool quit = false;
    GameState game(boxes);

    while(true)
    {
        int action = game.getAction();

        switch(action)
        {
            case DISPLAY_ACTION:
                game.display();
                break;
            case MOVE_ACTION:
                string boxId;
                int x, y; 
                //get those somehow...

                game.moveBox(boxId, x, y);
                break;
            case QUIT;
                quit = true;
                break;
        }
        if (quit)
            break;
    }
}

int GameState::getAction(box& aBox)
{
    //return some action code
}

bool GameState::checkMove(string boxId, int x, y)
{
    //check box
}

void GameState::display()
{

}

void GameState::moveBox(string boxId, int x, int y)
{
    if (checkMove(boxId, x, y))
    {
        //more code
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
void display() //forgot brackets ;) – ezod Nov 4 '12 at 0:15
    
Its basically a collision checker for a game and I want the checker to be called in the display function so before it actually displays the image it checks if there was a collision or not. Thanks for all your help! – Vico Pelaez Nov 4 '12 at 0:34
    
@VicoPelaez then you probably want a class or structure to maintain the state. – Geoff Montee Nov 4 '12 at 0:35
    
@Geoff_Montee is the structure I am using not enough? That structure puts the objects inside my game in the box so if the car which is inside a box touches the boxes from any of the other objects in my game then detects the collision and the game is over if I am clear in this – Vico Pelaez Nov 4 '12 at 0:41
    
@VicoPelaez if your box contains the game, then why do you try to define multiple boxes? Anyway, check out my edits. – Geoff Montee Nov 4 '12 at 0:44

First off, the prototype of the display function is missing its parameters:

void display(/* parameters here if needed */) {
//I want to call the void checker here
}

About your question, calling a function is a trivial thing. For example, with a display function without any parameters:

void display() {
    // have some boxes defined here
    Box ba,bb,bc,bd,be,bq;
    // here we have some code related to the boxes
    // (...)
    // (...)
    // and now we call the function checker
    checker(ba,bb,bc,cd,be,bq);
}

However, it seems like you also want to create the content of the boxes in checker, and then display them in display. In order to do that, you need to pass the Box objects by reference to checker, so that any modification made by that function remains when the function is exited.

Thus you need to change the prototype of checker to:

void checker(box &A, box &B, box &C, box &D, box &E, box &Q){
   /* your function body here */
}
share|improve this answer
    
so I should put something like void display(void checker)?? or just checker like void display(checker)? – Vico Pelaez Nov 4 '12 at 0:19
    
you don't need to pass the checker function as a parameter to the display function. As long as checker is declared or defined before display the example given above should be fine. – didierc Nov 4 '12 at 0:51
    
I added more explanations regarding the way you want to use checker – didierc Nov 4 '12 at 0:57

You need more clarification of your question. But from the context, it's suggesting that you are trying to do following:

  1. You have a game that contains a set of objects.
  2. Each object is represented by the this struct:

    struct box { };
    
  3. You have a display function that displays the state (layout) of your game.

  4. You want to check whether there is collision before you display.

If above is what you are trying to achieve, following code might do the job:

class Game {
public:
  Game() {} // Initialize your box objects here
  ~Game() {}

  void display() {
    // Your code
    checker(a_, b_); // Check here
    // Display code
  }

private:
  struct Box {
    // box state data
  };

  Box a_;
  Box b_;
  // ... etc.

  void checker(const Box& a, const Box& b) const {
    // Do your check here
    // I used const here assuming your checker has no side effects 
  }

};
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