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I'm a newbie to Fluent Nhibernate (FNH) or NHibernate (or even ORMs) in general. I have a pet project that I'm using to learn FNH and I'm stuck with, what looks like a design issue. Its a basic Library Management System and I have objects like books, users, booksize(!) etc. For instance, I have a BookSize class and its manager BookSizesManager which hold a list of BookSize objects. Could please anyone advise me how to go about creating ClassMap for both of them such that my database (for testing purpose, say a SQLite database) would have only one table called 'BookSizes' and would list all the BookSize objects in BookSizeManager?

My current implementation is as followed and flawed as it produces two tables 1. BookSize 2. BookSizes (from BookSizeManager Map).

My BookSize Class

public class BookSize
{
    public virtual string ID { get; set; }
    public virtual string Name { get; set; }
    public virtual double Length { get; set; }
    public virtual double Width { get; set; }
}

Corresponding ClassMap

public class BookSizeMap : ClassMap<BookSize>
{
    public BookSizeMap()
    {
        Id(x => x.ID);
        Map(x => x.Name);
        Map(x => x.Length);
        Map(x => x.Width);
    }
}

My BookSizesManager Class

public class BookSizesManager
{
    public virtual string Id { get; set; }

    private IList<BookSize> m_bookSizes = new List<BookSize>();
    public virtual IList<BookSize> Items
    {
        get { return new ReadOnlyCollection<BookSize>(m_bookSizes); } 
        set { if(value != null) m_bookSizes = value; }
    }

    public virtual void Add(BookSize size)
    {
        if (size != null)
        {
            m_bookSizes.Add(size); 
        }
    }// Also contains other unimplemented CRUD methods, but haven't listed them here to reduce 'noise'
}

Corresponding ClassMap

public class BookSizesManagerMap : ClassMap<BookSizesManager>
{
    public BookSizesManagerMap()
    {
        Id(x => x.Id);
        HasMany(x => x.Items)
            .Cascade.All();
        Table("BookSizes");
    }
}

Any help is greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Can anyone please help?!?! –  Kunal Nov 5 '12 at 18:01
    
Is Stackoverflow dead? –  Kunal Nov 6 '12 at 11:24
    
what does BookSizesManager do except CRUD? i mean when using NHibernate you already have ISession to do the CRUD –  Firo Nov 7 '12 at 8:08
    
Thanks for replying Firo. Yes I intend to make BookSizesManager to have CRUD operations implemented. Hence why the need for two classes. I understand that one can perform CRUD operation using FNH itself. –  Kunal Nov 7 '12 at 15:56
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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

i would get rid of BookSizesManager completly and use the session directly and specify the tablename explicitly

public class BookSizeMap : ClassMap<BookSize>
{
    public BookSizeMap()
    {
        Table("BookSizes");
        ...
    }
}

BookSizesManager.Add(booksize); becomes session.Save(booksize); BookSizesManager.Get(booksizeId); becomes session.Get(booksizeId);

share|improve this answer
    
I was thinking more of having a 'manager' to do all CRUD operations. And thereby having it 'readily accessible' in the application rather than querying it using FNH, every time I need something from it. I'm unsure if I'm on the correct side of design principles here. Pardon my ignorance and guide me. Thanks again for answering! –  Kunal Nov 7 '12 at 15:58
    
sounds like a cache or something which holds often needed data in memory, nothing that has to be persisted. if nothing really has to be persistent then get rid of NHibernate as well and use LINQ on collections. If you need guidance for a desctop app i would suggest msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/ee819139.aspx –  Firo Nov 7 '12 at 18:08
    
Ok. Makes sense. I do want books etc to be persisted. But then also heard of ORMs that are capable of caching things. Also, are these query efficient enough i.e. better than directly querying the database, say using LINQtoSQL? Thanks for being patient with my naiveness for the matter. –  Kunal Nov 8 '12 at 23:31
    
perfromance of a single database call is usually no problem, it is querying the database many times eg in a loop which causes performance to suffer. That is remedied with batching selects, joining tables and the use of NHibernates first and second level caches. –  Firo Nov 9 '12 at 12:34
    
I'm trying to make this library as scalable and easily pluggable into various interfaces i.e. Desktop app or a Web application. On web, we may have many 'common queries', the results of which would be wise to have cached. I suppose I'll have to do some more fact-finding on caching in FNH. If you know of any, could you please suggest some good link with examples for a novice like me? Thanks. –  Kunal Nov 9 '12 at 17:09
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