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This was a question from a data structures course at my university. I don't understand what the question means. Can anybody elaborate me on the question, and the answer for it.

Suppose we insert all the numbers between 1 and 15 into an initially empty binary search tree; all permutations of these keys are equally likely to be the insertion order. Compute the probability of the resulting tree having 10 as its root, 7 as the left child of the root and 15 as the right child of the root.

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closed as not a real question by Mitch Wheat, Anony-Mousse, philant, Bo Persson, Pfitz Nov 4 '12 at 11:16

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
ask your superviser... – Mitch Wheat Nov 4 '12 at 1:21
up vote 2 down vote accepted

In order for "10 as its root, 7 as the left child of the root and 15 as the right child of the root." to happen, the insertion order for the tree must be either:

  • 10 first, then 7, then 15, then the other 12 numbers in some order.
  • 10 first, then 15, then 7, then the other 12 numbers in some order.

Now consider: how many ways that can happen?

  • 1 way to first choose 10, then choose 7, then choose 15; and 12! ways to choose the rest.
  • 1 way to first choose 10, then choose 15, then choose 7; and again 12! ways to choose the rest.

So that's (12! * 2) ways to end up with that particular arrangement.

Now, the set of all possible insertion orders is the permutation of 15 numbers, which is 15! (factorial)

Note that the question says "all permutations of these keys are equally likely to be the insertion order", so it's concerned with the number of possible ways to construct the tree, not the actual number of distinct resultant trees (there is a difference, because different insertion orders may yet end up building the same tree (e.g. the 2 cases above minus the 12 other numbers would build the same tree despite different insertion orders)

Probability is: (The number of ways to build the arrangement specified by the question) divided by (the total number of possible ways to build the tree):

So (12! * 2) / (15!) is the probability you want.

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ahh Alright.. so it is 2/13!. Am i right? – Assasins Nov 4 '12 at 1:25
    
okay! thank you – Assasins Nov 4 '12 at 1:29
    
@Fazlan np! also, I misread your question (thought it was 16 elements in total), so please see the updated numbers =) – sampson-chen Nov 4 '12 at 1:43
    
yeah You are right. – Assasins Nov 4 '12 at 2:08

Unless you create a self balancing tree, the tree you obtain is different according to the order of element insertion. For the root to be 10, 10 must be the first number inserted. this has probability 1 out of 15 or 1/15 then, for 7 and 15 to be the first children the probability is 2/14*1/13

Total: 1/15*2/14*2/13

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but that answer seems to be different with the answer of sampson-chen – Assasins Nov 4 '12 at 1:31

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