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Why is the animation not working? The shape doesn't move when I run the program.

from Tkinter import *
import time



class alien(object):
     def __init__(self):
        self.root = Tk()
        self.canvas = Canvas(self.root, width=400, height = 400)
        self.canvas.pack()
        alien1 = self.canvas.create_oval(20, 260, 120, 360, outline='white',         fill='blue')
        alien2 = self.canvas.create_oval(2, 2, 40, 40, outline='white', fill='red')
        self.canvas.pack()
        self.root.mainloop()

     def animation(self):
        track = 0
        while True:
        x = 5
        y = 0
        if track == 0:
           for i in range(0,51):
                self.time.sleep(0.025)
                self.canvas.move(alien1, x, y)
                self.canvas.move(alien2, x, y)
                self.canvas.update()
           track = 1
           print "check"

        else:
           for i in range(0,51):
                self.time.sleep(0.025)
                self.canvas.move(alien1, -x, y)
                self.canvas.move(alien2, -x, y)
                self.canvas.update()
           track = 0
        print track

alien()
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1  
'?????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????/' doesn't really help us. What happens that you don't expect to, or doesn't work? If you get an exception, give it to us in full. –  Lattyware Nov 4 '12 at 1:28
2  
more question marks please –  Mitch Wheat Nov 4 '12 at 1:28
    
was trying to get the oval to move from left to right on the x-xis –  mvitagames Nov 4 '12 at 1:32
    
is there something that i need to import ? because i looked up forum online and it make sense to only import Tkinter and timer, not sure what i am missing –  mvitagames Nov 4 '12 at 1:33
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You never called the animation method. There were a couple of other naming issues.

from Tkinter import *
import time

class alien(object):
     def __init__(self):
        self.root = Tk()
        self.canvas = Canvas(self.root, width=400, height = 400)
        self.canvas.pack()
        self.alien1 = self.canvas.create_oval(20, 260, 120, 360, outline='white',         fill='blue')
        self.alien2 = self.canvas.create_oval(2, 2, 40, 40, outline='white', fill='red')
        self.canvas.pack()
        self.root.after(0, self.animation)
        self.root.mainloop()

     def animation(self):
        track = 0
        while True:
            x = 5
            y = 0
            if track == 0:
               for i in range(0,51):
                    time.sleep(0.025)
                    self.canvas.move(self.alien1, x, y)
                    self.canvas.move(self.alien2, x, y)
                    self.canvas.update()
               track = 1
               print "check"

            else:
               for i in range(0,51):
                    time.sleep(0.025)
                    self.canvas.move(self.alien1, -x, y)
                    self.canvas.move(self.alien2, -x, y)
                    self.canvas.update()
               track = 0
            print track

alien()
share|improve this answer
    
wow i wouldn't of caught those mistake, can u give tips on how to become i good programmer? any website or book that may help me improve on this hobby because i Find it very interesting.... and thank you very much sir!!! –  mvitagames Nov 4 '12 at 1:47
    
Practice as much as possible and pay attention to small details. In this case, all the naming issues were identified by reading the error messages when the program was run. –  Tim Nov 4 '12 at 1:52
    
Putting sleeps in the code is a bad idea. Even though they are short, every time you sleep the entire GUI will be unresponsive. –  Bryan Oakley Nov 4 '12 at 3:08
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Your animation method has a while True loop in it which never breaks. This is a no-no in a GUI program, because by never returning, it prevents the event-loop from processing events. So, for example, if you had a Menu, then the user would not be able to select any menu item. The GUI would appear frozen, except for whatever actions you implement in the animation method.

Here is a slight modification of @Tim's code which fixes this problem by removing the while loop and simply moving the aliens one step before returning. self.master.after is called at the end of the animation method to have the event loop call animation again after a short pause.


class Alien(object):
    def __init__(self, canvas, *args, **kwargs):
        self.canvas = canvas
        self.id = canvas.create_oval(*args, **kwargs)
        self.vx = 5
        self.vy = 0
    def move(self):
        x1, y1, x2, y2 = self.canvas.bbox(self.id)
        if x2 > 400: self.vx = -5
        if x1 < 0: self.vx = 5
        self.canvas.move(self.id, self.vx, self.vy)

class App(object):
     def __init__(self, master, **kwargs):
        self.master = master             
        self.canvas = tk.Canvas(self.master, width = 400, height = 400)
        self.canvas.pack()
        self.aliens = [
            Alien(self.canvas, 20, 260, 120, 360, outline = 'white', fill = 'blue'),
            Alien(self.canvas, 2, 2, 40, 40, outline = 'white', fill = 'red'),
            ]
        self.canvas.pack()
        self.master.after(0, self.animation)

     def animation(self):
         for alien in self.aliens:
             alien.move()
         self.master.after(12, self.animation)

root = tk.Tk()
app = App(root)
root.mainloop()
share|improve this answer
    
o ic, but what is the difference between from Tkinter import * and import Tkinter as tk?? –  mvitagames Nov 4 '12 at 6:10
    
from Tkinter import * imports the Tkinter module and adds all the (public) globals from the Tkinter module into the current module's namespace. import Tkinter as tk imports the Tkinter module and adds the module object itself -- referenced by tk -- to the current module's namespace. I never use from modulename import * because it makes it harder to trace where variables come from. See this FAQ for advice on "best practices" for using import in a module. –  unutbu Nov 4 '12 at 10:33
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