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Hoping that someone could provide a function that given a date, it will return the NYSE trading day of month.

If it takes into consideration holidays that is a bonus, if not I'm not too worried.

Thanks in advance!

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2  
That is a valid (if oddly worded) question (and I happen to be the author of the interface package used in the answer below). – Dirk Eddelbuettel Nov 4 '12 at 13:33
up vote 3 down vote accepted

There are a few packages that handle fiddly calendar issues, which are fiddly. To quote from timeDate:

"It is non-trivial to implement function for business days, weekends and holidays. It is not difficult in an algorithmic sense, but it can become tedious to implement the rules of the calendar themselves, for example the date of Easter."

Still, if I have interpreted your question correctly, something like this should work (although you might want to think about the result you want if myDate is not itself a trading day...at the moment it gives the trading day of the previous trading day).

library(RQuantLib)

tradingDayOfMonth <- function(myDate, calendar = "UnitedStates/NYSE") {
  FirstOfMonth <- as.Date(paste(year(myDate), month(myDate), "01", sep="/")) 
  businessDaysBetween(calendar, from = FirstOfMonth, to = myDate,
                      includeFirst = 1, includeLast = 1)
}

tradingDayOfMonth(as.Date("2012/11/05"))
# [1] 3
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I have a function in a personal package called TradingDates that uses holiday calendars from the timeDate package to return the dates of all trading days in the year(s) specified. I included the code for that function at the end of this post along with functions PrevTradingDate and NextTradingDate which were the motivation for the TradingDates function.

Once you have sourced that code, it is easy to make a funcion that will return which trading day of the month a given date falls on. For now, the input date must be a (single) trading date, but that could be easily changed depending on your preference.

TradingDayOfMonth <- function(Date, FUN=holidayNYSE, ...) {
  if (length(Date) > 1) stop('not vectorized; Date should be length 1')
  Date <- as.Date(Date, ...)
  tdy <- TradingDates(format(Date, "%Y"), FUN=FUN) #trading dates in year
  if (!Date %in% tdy) stop("Date is not a Trading Date")
  tdm <- tdy[format(tdy, "%m") %in% format(Date, "%m")] # trading dates in the same month as "Date"
  which(tdm == Date)
}

R> PrevTradingDate()
[1] "2012-11-02"
R> NextTradingDate()
[1] "2012-11-05"
R> TradingDayOfMonth(PrevTradingDate())
[1] 2
R> TradingDayOfMonth(NextTradingDate())
[1] 3
R> TradingDayOfMonth('2012-11-15')
[1] 11

Code required for above to work:

#' Get Trading Dates for one or more years
#'
#' Get a vector of dates of non-holiday weekdays.
#' 
#' This uses holiday calendar functions (\code{holidayNYSE} by default)
#' from the \emph{timeDate} package.  If \emph{timeDate} is not loaded, it 
#' will be temporarily loaded, then unloaded \code{on.exit}.
#' 
#' @param year vector of 4 digit years or something that is coercible to 
#'   a vector 4 digit years via \code{as.numeric}
#' @param FUN a function that takes a \code{year} argument and returns a vector
#'   that can be coerced to a \code{Date}.  \code{holidayNYSE} by default. Most
#'   likely, this will be one of:  \sQuote{holidayLONDON}, \sQuote{holidayNERC}, 
#'   \sQuote{holidayNYSE}, \sQuote{holidayTSX}, \sQuote{holidayZURICH}
#' @return a vector of all dates in \code{years} that are weekdays and not 
#'   holidays.
#' @author GSee
#' @examples
#' \dontrun{
#' TradingDates(2012)
#' TradingDates(2010:2011)
#' }
#' @export
TradingDates <- function(year=format(Sys.Date(), "%Y"), FUN=holidayNYSE) {
  # the next few lines should be removed when this code is added to a package
  # that Imports timeDate
  if (!"package:timeDate" %in% search()) {
    suppressPackageStartupMessages({ 
      if (!require(timeDate)) {
        stop("timeDate must be installed to use this function.")
      }
    })
    on.exit(detach(package:timeDate, unload=TRUE))
  }
  ## End of code that should be removed when this is added to a package
  year <- as.numeric(year)
  fun <- match.fun(FUN)
  do.call('c', lapply(year, function(y) {
    holidays <- as.Date(fun(year=y))
    all.days <- seq.Date(as.Date(paste(y, '01-01', sep='-')), 
                         as.Date(paste(y, '12-31', sep='-')), by='days')
    nohol <- all.days[!all.days %in% holidays]
    nohol[!format(nohol, '%w') %in% c("6", "0")] #neither holiday nor weekend
  }))
}


#' Get Date of previous (next) trading day
#' 
#' Get the Date of the previous (next) trading day.
#' 
#' For \code{PrevTradingDate}, \code{n} is the number of days to go back. So,
#' if \code{n} is 2 and today is a a Monday, it would return the date of the
#' prior Thursday because that would be 2 trading days ago.
#' \code{n} works analogously in \code{NextTradingDate}.
#'
#' The maximum value that \code{n} can be is the total number of days in the
#' year prior to \code{Date} plus the total number of years in the current 
#' year of \code{Date}.  So, on the last day of the year, the max value of
#' \code{n} will usually be \code{504} (because most years have 252 trading 
#' days).  One the first day of the year, the max value of \code{n} will usually
#' be \code{252}.
#'
#' @param n number of days to go back. 1 is the previous trading day; 2 is the
#'   trading day before that, etc.  \code{n} should be less than 365, but see
#'   details
#' @param Date a \code{Date} or something that can be coerced to a \code{Date}
#' @return \code{PrevTradingDate} returns the date of the previous trading day 
#' up to, but not including, \code{Date}.  \code{NextTradingDate} returns the 
#' date of the next trading day.
#' @author GSee
#' @seealso \code{\link{TradingDates}}
#' @examples
#' \dontrun{
#' PrevTradingDate()
#' PrevTradingDate('2012-01-03')
#' NextTradingDate()
#' NextTradingDate('2012-12-24')
#' }
#' @export
#' @rdname PrevTradingDate
PrevTradingDate <- function(Date=Sys.Date(), n=1) {
  stopifnot(require(xts)) #remove this line when this is added to a package that Imports xts (needed for first/last)
  D <- as.Date(Date)
  y <- as.numeric(format(D, "%Y"))
  trading.days <- TradingDates(y)
  out <- trading.days[trading.days < Date]
  if (length(out) >= n) {
    first(last(out, n))
  } else { 
    prev.year.td <- TradingDates(y - 1)
    max.n <- length(out) + length(prev.year.td)
    if (n > max.n) stop("'n' is too large. Try something less than 252.")
    new.n <- n - length(out) # we need this many trading days from previous year
    # if it's the 1st trading day of the year, return the last trading date of
    # previous year
    first(last(TradingDates(y - 1), new.n))
  } 
}

#' @export
#' @rdname PrevTradingDate
NextTradingDate <- function(Date=Sys.Date(), n=1) {
  stopifnot(require(xts)) #remove this line when this is added to a package that Imports xts (needed for first/last)
  D <- as.Date(Date)
  y <- as.numeric(format(D, "%Y"))
  trading.days <- TradingDates(y)
  out <- trading.days[trading.days > Date]
  if (length(out) >= n) {
    last(first(out, n))
  } else { 
    next.year.td <- TradingDates(y + 1)
    max.n <- length(out) + length(next.year.td)
    new.n <- n - length(out) # how many trading days we need from next year
    if (n > max.n) stop("'n' is too large. Try something less than 252.")
    # if it's the last trading day of the year, return the first trading date of
    # next year
    last(first(TradingDates(y + 1), new.n))
  }
}
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