Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I've been trying to debug this C++ error for many hours over 2 days and unable to figure it out or find answers in searching. Can anyone help illuminate me how to fix this?

Error:

111:44: error: arithmetic on a pointer to the function type 'double (double, int)'
            return (principal * (pow((effective_rate + 1), years_elapsed)));
                                      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ^

Relevant code:

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <string>
#include <cmath>

using namespace std;

using std::ios; 
using std::cin;
using std::cout;
using std::endl;

double effective_rate(double annual_rate, int num_times_compounded=0);
double balance(double annual_rate, double principal, double &years_elapsed, int num_times_compounded=0);

double annual_rate;
int num_times_compounded;
double principal;
double years_elapsed;

int main() {
 //code to get inputs and do printouts
}

double effective_rate(double annual_rate, int num_times_compounded) 
{
    if (num_times_compounded > 0) {
        return (pow((1 + (annual_rate/num_times_compounded)), num_times_compounded) - 1);
    }   else {
        return (pow(e, annual_rate) - 1);
    }
}

double balance(double annual_rate, double principal, double years_elapsed, int num_times_compounded)
{
    if (num_times_compounded > 0) {
[**this is line 111:**] return (principal * (pow((effective_rate + 1), years_elapsed)));
    } else {
        return (principal * (pow( (effective_rate + 1), num_times_compounded) ) );
    }
}

It appears that the second function does not see the first effective_rate function, and changing to pass by reference did not seem to work either. I must be missing something simple and obvious?

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by jogojapan, Benjamin Bannier, Maerlyn, RivieraKid, brimborium Nov 4 '12 at 15:43

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4  
What do you mean (in your code) by effective_rate + 1? After all, effective_rate is a function, not a number. – jogojapan Nov 4 '12 at 1:44

You need to call the function using its parameters. You cannot call a function without using parentheses and its arguments (if it has) inside it.

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <string>
#include <cmath>

double effective_rate(double annual_rate, int num_times_compounded=0);
double balance(double annual_rate, double principal, double years_elapsed, int num_times_compounded=0);

double annual_rate;
int num_times_compounded;
double principal;
double years_elapsed;

int main() {
 //code to get inputs and do printouts
}

double effective_rate(double annual_rate, int num_times_compounded) 
{
    if (num_times_compounded > 0) {
        return (pow((1 + (annual_rate/num_times_compounded)), num_times_compounded) - 1);
    }   else {
        return (pow(e, annual_rate) - 1);
    }
}

double balance(double annual_rate, double principal, double years_elapsed, int num_times_compounded)
{
    if (num_times_compounded > 0) {
        return (principal * (pow((effective_rate(annual_rate, num_times_compounded) + 1), years_elapsed)));
    } else {
        return (principal * (pow((effective_rate(annual_rate, num_times_compounded) + 1), num_times_compounded) ) );
    }
}

This will work but you need to define e first.

Also, you should avoid using globals as much as possible. In your case, you have conflicting names. For example, you are defining annual_rate and num_times_compounded as global variables and using those very same names as arguments of your functions. The global variables will not be used in those cases.

Edit: Oh and finally, you should also avoid using using directives. Typing std:: doesn't take much effort and makes your code safer from dumb errors.

Edit: To answer OP's last question, you can use the ternary conditional operator but you sacrifice readability. The only other I can see it done it by using a third variable to store the result of the ternary conditional operation and then use that variable as the period.

double balance(double annual_rate, double principal, double years_elapsed, int num_times_compounded)
{
    return (principal * (pow((effective_rate(annual_rate, num_times_compounded) + 1), num_times_compounded > 0 ? years_elapsed : num_times_compounded)));
}

Or with the variable.. probably cleaner.

double balance(double annual_rate, double principal, double years_elapsed, int num_times_compounded)
{
    double period = num_times_compounded > 0 ? years_elapsed : num_times_compounded;
    return (principal * (pow((effective_rate(annual_rate, num_times_compounded) + 1), period )));
}
share|improve this answer
1  
or simply use exp(annual_rate) instead ... – MartinStettner Nov 4 '12 at 1:49
    
An effective rate is not just e^n. His function is actually correct. – Alexandre P. Levasseur Nov 4 '12 at 1:52
    
@AlexandreP.Levasseur +1, but I think Martin's point is that you could use std::exp(annual_rate) instead of std::pow(e,annual_rate) (not instead of effective_rate()). Then you wouldn't have to define e. – jogojapan Nov 4 '12 at 1:56
1  
Oh that's right. Missed that. – Alexandre P. Levasseur Nov 4 '12 at 1:56
1  
@jogojapan yes that's what I meant (typing on an stupid iPad, don't want to write too much :) ...) – MartinStettner Nov 4 '12 at 2:03

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.