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My code is very simple. Ans to me it should work.

var preview = WinJS.Class.define(
   function (el, options) {
       el.winControl = this;
       this.el = el;

       this.textarea = d.getElementById('preview-input');
       this.preview = d.getElementById('preview-text');
       this.form = d.getElementById('perview-form');

       this.preview.addEventListener('click', this.click, false);
       //WinJS.Utilities.query("button", this.form)
       //this.preview.addEventListener('', this.save, false);

   },

   {
       click: function (e) {
           this.form.style('display', 'block');
       }
   }
);

WinJS.Namespace.define('RegCtrl', { preview: preview });

But when click occurs this.form seems to be undefined of null. Why? I do not want to initialize objects in every method of the class.

New tests

I made additional test very small

var preview = WinJS.Class.define(
   function (el, options) {
       var test = 1;
       this.test = 1;
       this.test1();
   },

   {
       test1: function () {
           console.log(this.form, test);
       }
   }

); WinJS.Namespace.define('RegCtrl', { preview: preview });

This test fails on line this.test1();. What I think now that this class is called RegCtrl.preview() rather than new RegCtrl.preview().

How do I shek inside the function that this called as new but not a simple function?

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The other answers aren't explaining what's going on, and as such are giving incorrect advice.

JavaScript has first-class function objects - you can pass them around as values. That's exactly what you're doing when you set up this callback:

this.preview.addEventListener('click', this.click, false);

You're taking the contents of the this.click property, which happens to be a function, and handing it to the addEventListener function to do whatever it wants with it.

I was very specific about terminology there - note I specifically said function, not method. JavaScript doesn't really have a method construct, it just has methods as properties on an object.

So where does the "this" member come from? It's determined at the caller - the object you use on the left side of the '.' is the one that becomes the value of this. For example,

function exampleFunc() { console.log("this.myName = " + this.myName); }

var a = { myName: "Chris", doSomething: exampleFunc };
var b = { myName: "Bob", doSomething: exampleFunc };

Note I've assigned the exact same function to the doSomething properties. What what happens:

a.doSomething(); // Outputs "this.myName = Chris"
b.doSomething(); // Outputs "this.myName = Bob"

The exact same function object, called through two different objects, has a different this pointer.

exampleFunc is a global function, let's call it:

exampleFunc() // Outputs "this.myName = undefined"

So where'd the undefined come from? In a global function, "this" is set to window (the global scope), which didn't have the myName property defined. Which also means that you could do this instead:

myName = "Global Name"; // note, no var - we want this global
exampleFunc(); // Outputs "this.myName = Global Name"

Ok, so what's going on with the original question? Basically, you've passed the function this.click to be the callback, but you haven't passed the "this" pointer that you want it called through. Actually, addEventListener doesn't have a way to pass the this pointer. As a result, when the function is invoked this is not pointing at your object. I don't remember off the top of my head what it's pointing at - it's either window or the element that was clicked on, check the DOM documentation to verify.

To get it to call the right function with the right context (context = the correct "this"), the traditional approach is to use a closure. Capture "this" in a variable, then pass in an anonymous function that calls your actual callback with the right this pointer. The code looks like this:

var preview = WinJS.Class.define(
   function (el, options) {

       // Capture your current this pointer in a global variable
       // Using "that" as the name comes from JavaScript: The Good Parts book
       var that = this;

       el.winControl = this;
       this.el = el;

       this.textarea = d.getElementById('preview-input');
       this.preview = d.getElementById('preview-text');
       this.form = d.getElementById('perview-form');

       // Note what gets passed instead of this.click:
       this.preview.addEventListener('click', 
           function (e) {
               // NOTE: Calling through "that": "this" isn't pointing to the right object anymore
               // Calling through "that" resets "this" inside the call to click
               that.click(e);
           }, false);    
   },

   {
       click: function (e) {
           this.form.style('display', 'block');
       }
   }
);

This is a common enough pattern that ECMAScript 5 has a utility function to build these wrappers for you - function.bind. Do this:

       this.preview.addEventListener('click', 
           this.click.bind(this),
           false);    

The construct this.click.bind(this) will construct a new function that, when called, will set the "this" reference to whatever you passed (in this case "this"), and then invoke the function you called it on.

Yes, there are a lot of different values for "this" floating around. Keeping track of what "this" is pointing at is an important part of mastering JavaScript programming.

share|improve this answer
1  
What I can say? This is simple awesome explanation. Just what I wanted. Not only formula how to fix but understand what happening behind the scene. Thank you! – Sergey Romanov Nov 13 '12 at 14:08

I think you may want to define a global JavaScript variable as :

     var myForm = document.getElementById('perview-form');

or jest define var myForm; and initialize inside function (el, options) as:

     myForm = d.getElementById('perview-form');

Now you can use this variable in your function as :

     myForm.style('display', 'block');

EDIT: I believe you may define this variable as first line in your WinJS.Class.define to make it instance level variable as below:

     var preview = WinJS.Class.define(
         var myForm;
         function (el, options) {
           ....
           ....
           myForm = d.getElementById('perview-form');
           ...
         },

         {
            click: function (e) {
            myForm.style('display', 'block');
         }
       });
share|improve this answer
    
That works. As a solution I can use it but i would like more clear code. If it is used only within the class I would like it to be only there. Or at least understanding what happening. – Sergey Romanov Nov 4 '12 at 4:38
1  
@SergeyRomanov This is because, this is special variable which is passed as a new reference from onclick event origin. If you want to deal with multiple variables in one object, define a new JavaScript object with all those variables and use that object. – Yogendra Singh Nov 4 '12 at 4:42
    
Oh! Right! This is an element we have clicked on! how could I overlook it?! Thank you very much :) – Sergey Romanov Nov 4 '12 at 4:49
    
@SergeyRomanov: If you think this is helpful, please don't forget to accept the answer. – Yogendra Singh Nov 4 '12 at 4:52
    
@SergeyRomanov: I updated the answer with instance level variable as well. Check if that works. – Yogendra Singh Nov 4 '12 at 6:42

This is a really hard thing to research if you don't know what to look for. I added one line and changed another line. That should fix your issue.

In short, the keyword this gets reset every time you enter a new function, this the value of this inside your click function is not the same this of the outer scope. Preserve this this you want. The name of that seems fairly common.

Edited based on the link provided by the OP.
This code is UNTESTED. If using this doesn't work now, then I'd try this2
Sorry I can't test this, but I don't have the framework anywhere so I'm doing educated guesswork.

var preview = WinJS.Class.define(

  function (el, options) {
    that = this; // No var should be needed since it is declared already
    el.winControl = this;
    this.el = el;

    this.textarea = d.getElementById('preview-input');
    this.preview = d.getElementById('preview-text');
    this.form = d.getElementById('perview-form');

    this.preview.addEventListener('click', this.click, false);
    //WinJS.Utilities.query("button", this.form)
    //this.preview.addEventListener('', this.save, false);

  },
  // This is the section for instance vars
  {
    click: function (e) {
      that.form.style('display', 'block'); // AND THIS ONE
    },
    that: null // Added instance variable
  },

  // And these are static variables
  {
    that2: null
  }
);
share|improve this answer
    
How it sais that thatis undefined. 0x800a1391 - JavaScript runtime error: 'that' is undefined – Sergey Romanov Nov 4 '12 at 4:35
    
may be I have to define it globally before class definition? – Sergey Romanov Nov 4 '12 at 4:36
    
Mm.. I don't know the syntax that you need for your WinJS.Class.define -- but a global variable is a bad way to deal with it. – Jeremy J Starcher Nov 4 '12 at 4:38
    
<msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/apps/br229813.aspx>; This is syntax. Could you please look at it and say may be I have to use static Members? – Sergey Romanov Nov 4 '12 at 4:51
    
Look , I edited topic and added new details. Can you say if that could be the reason? – Sergey Romanov Nov 4 '12 at 5:04

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