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I am given N numbers a[1..N] and 2 other integers L and H. How can I Count the number of tuples (i,j,k) satisfying i < j < k and L <= a[i] + a[j] + a[k] <= H.

1 <= T <= 100
1 <= N <= 1000
1 <= L <= H <= 1000000
1 <= a[i] <= 1000000 

PS: Need Better Solution than N2logn

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Within a reasonable time limit? Is T the number of tuples? –  irrelephant Nov 4 '12 at 4:21
    
No of test cases –  user1543957 Nov 4 '12 at 4:23
    
Have you tried a brute force approach? Sometimes it's a good starting point for algorithm design. –  FoolishSeth Nov 4 '12 at 4:31
3  
Ok so YOUR challenge is to dream-up a way of eliminating impossibilities (tuples which cannot meet the requirements) quickly... and quickly usually means avoiding considering chunks of tuples... How could you do that? PS: Could you please post a link to the challenge? –  corlettk Nov 4 '12 at 4:41
1  
Isn't this a variation of the 3SUM problem? :\ –  st0le Nov 4 '12 at 4:50
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Solution

Since my C/C++ is somewhat rusty and this is primarily an algorithms question, I will write in pseudocode (mostly correct C/C++ with bits of algorithms that would take a while to write out).

If you have at least sizeof(int)*10^12 bytes of memory and time available, you can use this algorithm with time complexity O(n^2 * log(n)).

// Sort the N numbers using your favorite, efficient sorting method. (Quicksort, mergesort, etc.) [O(n*log(n))].
int[] b = sort(a)
int[] c = int[length(b)^2];
// Compute the sums of all of the numbers (O(n^2))
for(int i = 0; i < length(b); i++){
    for (int j = i; j < length(b); j++){
        c[i*length(b)+j] = b[i]+b[j];
    }
}

// Sort the sum list (you can do the sorts in-place if you are comfortable) - O(n^2*log(n))
d = sort(c);

// For each number in your list, grab the list of of sums so that L<=num+sum<=H O(n)
// Use binary search to find the lower, upper bounds O(log(n))
// (Total complexity for this part: O(n*log(n))
int total = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < b; i++){
    int min_index = binary_search(L-b[i]); // search for largest number <= L-b[i]
    int max_index = binary_search(H-b[i]); // search for smallest number >= H-b[i]
    total += max_index - min_index + 1; // NOTE: This does not handle edge cases like not finding any sums that work
}

return total;
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4  
Hey Steve, There's no point in doing programming challenges if you don't do them (or least the crux of them) yourself... so I personally try to avoid giving handouts, or even too-big-hints, until the questioner admits to being stuck, and has evidently invested a lot of effort on their own behalf... then we (the community) become collaberators, not spoilers. Just my personal opinion. –  corlettk Nov 4 '12 at 4:52
3  
The size of c is n^2 so the time to sort it is O(n^2log(n^2)) –  fgb Nov 4 '12 at 5:06
1  
Oh yuck... some more optimization needed then. –  Steven Liao Nov 4 '12 at 5:07
3  
To me, "the right answer" depends on the motivations of the person asking the question... and I personally think that posting "complete algorithms" is counterproductuve where the point of the exercise WAS to make the questioner think it through in order to come-up with there own algorithm to solve an otherwise pointless problem... giving them priceless practice in developing there own algorithms, which is NOT an easy skill to learn, and certainly won't happen (for most of us) overnight. –  corlettk Nov 4 '12 at 5:07
2  
@fgb, O(n^2log(n^2)) is the same as O((n^2) log n) because log(n^2) = 2 log n. –  jwpat7 Nov 4 '12 at 7:00
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A basic approach:

for (i=0; i<N; i++) {
    for (j=i+1; j<N; j++) {
        for (k=j+1; k<N; k++) {
            int sum = a[i] + a[j] + a[k];
            if (L <= sum && sum <= H) number_of_tuples++;
        }
    }
}

Possibly better (might have a mistake in it, but the basic idea is to break if you're already over the maximum):

for (i=0; i<N; i++) {
    if (a[i] > H) continue;
    for (j=i+1; j<N; j++) {
        if (a[i] + a[j] > H) continue;
        for (k=j+1; k<N; k++) {
            int sum = a[i] + a[j] + a[k];
            if (L <= sum && sum <= H) number_of_tuples++;
        }
    }
}
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@onefoot, I upvoted it because it's a valid starting point... did you run it? How long does it take for the given limits? –  corlettk Nov 4 '12 at 4:39
    
No, I haven't run it; I just put it down as a baseline. –  1'' Nov 4 '12 at 4:43
    
@onefoot... Yup, that's getting better! –  corlettk Nov 4 '12 at 4:55
add comment
int find_three(int arr[], int c, int l,int h)
{
   int i, j, e, s, k;
   int count =0;
   sort(arr,arr+c);
   c--;
   while(arr[c]>h)
   c--;
   int sum=0;
   for (int i = 0; i<=c-2;i++)
   {  sum=arr[i]+arr[i+1]+arr[i+2];
      if(sum>h)
      break;
      for(j=i+1;j<=c-1;j++)
       {  
          for(k=j+1;k<=c;k++)
          {   sum=arr[i]+arr[j]+arr[k];
              if(sum>=l &&sum<=h)
                 count++;
              if(sum>h)
              break;
          }
           if(sum>h)
              break;
       }
   }
      return  count;
}
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