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Storing primitive values in a Java collection?

In java when I use the following :-

public HashMap<char, int> buildMap(String letters)
{
    HashMap<char, int> checkSum = new HashMap<char, int>();

    for ( int i = 0; i < letters.length(); ++i )
    {
        checkSum.put(letters.charAt(i), primes[i]);
    }

    return checkSum;
}

I get errors related to inappropriate types. I solved my problem by using Character and Integer instead of char and int respectively. However, I'm having trouble figuring out why HashMap fails to be able to deal with primitive data types.

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marked as duplicate by Paul Bellora, Mike Samuel, jahroy, Mark Rotteveel, Nishant Nov 4 '12 at 11:03

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
Okay, everybody... the OP is asking why. –  Paul Bellora Nov 4 '12 at 5:35
    
@PaulBellora That duplicate is also about the why –  Mark Rotteveel Nov 4 '12 at 8:44

7 Answers 7

up vote 24 down vote accepted

Generic parameters can only bind to reference types, not primitive types, so you need to use the corresponding wrapper types. Try HashMap<Character, Integer> instead.

However, I'm having trouble figuring out why HashMap fails to be able to deal with primitive data types.

This is due to type erasure. Java didn't have generics from the beginning so a HashMap<Character, Integer> is really a HashMap<Object, Object>. The compiler does a bunch of additional checks and implicit casts to make sure you don't put the wrong type of value in or get the wrong type out, but at runtime there is only one HashMap class and it stores objects.

Other languages "specialize" types so in C++, a vector<bool> is very different from a vector<my_class> internally which means that the two are not the same. Java defines things though so that a List<T> is a List regardless of what T is for backwards compatibility with pre-generic code. This backwards-compatibility requirement that there has to be a single implementation class for all parameterizations of a generic type prevents the kind of template specialization which would allow generic parameters to bind to primitives.

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The OP mentioned that, but is wondering why primitives don't work. –  Paul Bellora Nov 4 '12 at 5:33
    
@PaulBellora, please see my edits. –  Mike Samuel Nov 4 '12 at 5:40
    
Nice update! +1 –  Paul Bellora Nov 4 '12 at 5:42

Generic Collection classes cant be used with primitives. Use the Character and Integer wrapper classes instead.

Map<Character , Integer > checkSum = new HashMap<Character, Integer>();

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Hashmaps can only use classes, not primitives. This page from programmerinterview.com might be of use in guiding you to finding the answer. To be honest, I haven't figured out the answer to this problem in detail myself.

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You cannot put primitive types into collections. However, you can declare them using their corresponding object wrappers and still add the primitive values, as long as the boxing allows you.

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Generics can be defined using Wrapper classes only. If you don't want to define using Wrapper types, you may use the Raw definition as below

@SuppressWarnings("rawtypes")
public HashMap buildMap(String letters)
{
    HashMap checkSum = new HashMap();

    for ( int i = 0; i < letters.length(); ++i )
    {
       checkSum.put(letters.charAt(i), primes[i]);
    }
    return checkSum;
}

Or define the HashMap using wrapper types, and store the primitive types. The primitive values will be promoted to their wrapper types.

public HashMap<Character, Integer> buildMap(String letters)
{
  HashMap<Character, Integer> checkSum = new HashMap<Character, Integer>();

  for ( int i = 0; i < letters.length(); ++i )
  {
    checkSum.put(letters.charAt(i), primes[i]);
  }
  return checkSum;
}
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Generics only support object types, not primitives. Unlike C++ templates, generics don't involve code generatation and there is only one HashMap code regardless of the number of generic types of it you use.

Trove4J gets around this by pre-generating selected collections to use primitives and supports TCharIntHashMap which to can wrap to support the Map<Character, Integer> if you need to.

TCharIntHashMap: An open addressed Map implementation for char keys and int values.

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Generics can't use primitive types in the form of keywords.

Use

public HashMap<Character, Integer> buildMap(String letters)
{
    HashMap<Character, Integer> checkSum = new HashMap<Character, Integer>();

    for ( int i = 0; i < letters.length(); ++i )
    {
        checkSum.put(letters.charAt(i), primes[i]);
    }

    return checkSum;
}
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