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C++ how to sort an array variable

I got a parent class call

Shape

Shape got 2 child call

Square and Rectangle

Shape class got a variable call area, which is of int type

So i created some object of Square, Rectangle like this

int main()
{
    Shape *shaped[100];

    //then i did some adding of object..
    int areaValue;
    areaValue=1;

    shaped[0] = new Rectangle();
    shaped[0]->setArea(areaValue);

    areaValue=7;
    shaped[1] = new Square();
    shaped[1]->setArea(areaValue);

    areaValue=5;
    shaped[2] = new Square();
    shaped[2]->setArea(areaValue);

    shapeCounter = 3;


     sort(shaped, shaped + 3, sort_by_area());


    for (int i=0;i<shapeCounter;i++)
    {
        cout << shaped[i].getArea() << endl;
    }

}

Then at e.g Square.cpp

I did this

struct sort_by_area
{
    static bool operator()(Shape* x, Shape* y)
    {
        return x->getArea() < y->getArea();
    }
};

This code above works. and can sort by area, but my question is that can i still sort if i don't use struct , cause if i don't use struct, it will say the sort_by_area is not declared in scope.

Must i really use struct so my main.cpp can access the sort code that is located at the child class .cpp

Thanks

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marked as duplicate by juanchopanza, Benjamin Bannier, Frank van Puffelen, bmargulies, Nimit Dudani Nov 4 '12 at 20:43

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
what do you mean by "can i still sort if i don't use struct"? do you mean the Shape struct? –  Michael Nov 4 '12 at 7:07
    
@Michael - I think OP means the sort_by_area object. user1595932 - what's wrong with using a comparison object? The sort function expects a function object and this is an easy way to provide one. –  Ted Hopp Nov 4 '12 at 7:08
    
@Ted Hopp: Yes ok , i haven't noticed that he defined the comperator as a struct, it should be a regular comperator function. –  Michael Nov 4 '12 at 7:11
    
@user1595932: Here is an example of what is the correct way to use sort cplusplus.com/reference/algorithm/sort, cplusplus.com/forum/general/47440 –  Michael Nov 4 '12 at 7:13
    
@Michael, but how do i redo my code so i can use the normal way of sorting , however i now is sorting an array of pointers to object . Without calling it as struct sort_by_area , and maybe some other forms or is it pratically ok to use struct –  user1595932 Nov 4 '12 at 7:16

1 Answer 1

This works perfectly:

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

class Shape{

private:
    int x;
public:
    void setArea(int x){
        this->x =  x;
    }
    int getArea(){
        return this->x;
    }
};

class Rectangle: public Shape{
public:
};

class Square: public Shape{
public:
};

bool sort_by_area (Shape* x,Shape* y) { return (x->getArea() < y->getArea()); }
int main()
{
    Shape *shaped[100];

    //then i did some adding of object..
    int areaValue,shapeCounter = 0;
    areaValue=1;

    shaped[0] = new Rectangle();
    shaped[0]->setArea(areaValue);

    areaValue=7;
    shaped[1] = new Square();
    shaped[1]->setArea(areaValue);

    areaValue=5;
    shaped[2] = new Square();
    shaped[2]->setArea(areaValue);

    shapeCounter = 3;


    sort(shaped, shaped + 3, sort_by_area);


    for (int i=0;i<shapeCounter;i++)
    {
        cout << shaped[i]->getArea() << endl;
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
@user1595932: if this answer answered your needs , accept it –  Michael Nov 5 '12 at 6:04

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