Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to implement a function which decomposes a value into powers of two using java.

e.g: 14= 8 + 4 + 2

I need to find the powers of two which the value gets decomposed. For the above example I need 2,3,1 as outputs. How could I implement that?

share|improve this question
    
Are you familiar with logarithms? –  user1118321 Nov 4 '12 at 7:38
    
Yeah. I think I am –  Assasins Nov 4 '12 at 7:40
    
@user1118321 - logarithms are the wrong tool for this. –  Ted Hopp Nov 4 '12 at 7:41
3  
In a computer, integers are represented in two-complement which means they are already a sum of powers of two. All you need to do is determine which bits in an integer are set. –  Peter Lawrey Nov 4 '12 at 7:41
1  
Btw, is this homework? –  Hanno Binder Nov 4 '12 at 7:48

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

For this, you usually use bit-wise operations, namely the shift (<<,>>,>>>) and the bit-wise and (&) operator, because the internal representation of integers in computers already is binary, which is what you need.

In binary representation each integer value is a composition of powers of 2: 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, ...

So, 14 in decimal is in binary 1110: 8 + 4 + 2 + 0.

If you're after some nice, generic algorithm, you may want to start decomposing decimal numbers into their powers of 10 and from there on extend your solution to other bases, like 2.

share|improve this answer

Take advantage of the binary representation that Java uses. I don't know what form you want the powers of 2 to take, but you can loop through the bits one at a time by shifting and bit-wise & with 1 to test each bit. Each 1 bit represents a power of 2 in the sum.

For instance:

List<Integer> powers = new ArrayList<Integer>();
n = . . .; // something > 0
int power = 0;
while (n != 0) {
    if ((n & 1) != 0) {
        powers.add(1 << power);
        // or, if you just need the exponents:
        // powers.add(power);
    }
    ++power;
    n >>>= 1;
}
share|improve this answer
    
All computers and almost all language support binary representation. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Nov 4 '12 at 7:42
    
@PeterLawrey - Pretty much, but this is a Java question specifically. –  Ted Hopp Nov 4 '12 at 7:44
    
In that case I would use the special collection Java has for a set of bits. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Nov 4 '12 at 7:48
    
What is going on with the triple ">>>"? I'm trying to read up on this: arithmetic shifts, logical shifts? –  num3ric Nov 4 '12 at 7:48
1  
@num3ric - That's a shift with zero-fill instead of sign-fill. (Since I'm assuming that the number is > 0, it could just as well have been >>. Force of habit. [Actually, >>=.]) –  Ted Hopp Nov 4 '12 at 7:50

As integers are already represented as powers of two and Java has a collections for a set of bits I would use these two.

public static void main(String[] args) {
    System.out.println(bitsSet(14));
}

public static BitSet bitsSet(long num) {
    BitSet bitSet = new BitSet();
    for (int i = 0; i < 64; i++)
        if (((num >>> i) & 1) != 0)
            bitSet.set(i);
    return bitSet;
}

prints

{1, 2, 3}
share|improve this answer

You could simply subtract 2 from the value and keep subtracting subsequent higher powers.

int x = 0;
int value = args[0];
for (i=0, (value - Math.pow(2, i)) >= 0, i++) {
    value = value - Math.pow(2, i);
    x++;
}
for (i=0, i<x, i++) {
    System.out.println("addent: " + Math.pow(2, i);
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.