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I'm currently porting a small Winforms-based .NET application to use a native Mac front-end with MonoMac. The application has a TreeControl with icons and text, which does not exist out of the box in Cocoa.

So far, I've ported almost all of the ImageAndTextCell code in Apple's DragNDrop example: https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/#samplecode/DragNDropOutlineView/Listings/ImageAndTextCell_m.html#//apple_ref/doc/uid/DTS40008831-ImageAndTextCell_m-DontLinkElementID_6, which is assigned to an NSOutlineView as a custom cell.

It seems to be working almost perfectly, except that I have not figured out how to properly port the copyWithZone method. Unfortunately, this means the internal copies that NSOutlineView is making do not have the image field, and it leads to the images briefly vanishing during expand and collapse operations. The objective-c code in question is:

- (id)copyWithZone:(NSZone *)zone {
    ImageAndTextCell *cell = (ImageAndTextCell *)[super copyWithZone:zone];
    // The image ivar will be directly copied; we need to retain or copy it.
    cell->image = [image retain];
    return cell;
}

The first line is what's tripping me up, as MonoMac does not expose a copyWithZone method, and I don't know how to otherwise call it.

Update

Based on current answers and additional research and testing, I've come up with a variety of models for copying an object.

static List<ImageAndTextCell> _refPool = new List<ImageAndTextCell>();

// Method 1

static IntPtr selRetain = Selector.GetHandle ("retain");

[Export("copyWithZone:")]
public virtual NSObject CopyWithZone(IntPtr zone) {
    ImageAndTextCell cell = new ImageAndTextCell() {
        Title = Title,
        Image = Image,
    };

    Messaging.void_objc_msgSend (cell.Handle, selRetain);

    return cell;
}

// Method 2

[Export("copyWithZone:")]
public virtual NSObject CopyWithZone(IntPtr zone) {
    ImageAndTextCell cell = new ImageAndTextCell() {
        Title = Title,
        Image = Image,
    };

    _refPool.Add(cell);

    return cell;
}

[Export("dealloc")]
public void Dealloc ()
{
    _refPool.Remove(this);
    this.Dispose();
}

// Method 3

static IntPtr selRetain = Selector.GetHandle ("retain");

[Export("copyWithZone:")]
public virtual NSObject CopyWithZone(IntPtr zone) {
    ImageAndTextCell cell = new ImageAndTextCell() {
        Title = Title,
        Image = Image,
    };

    _refPool.Add(cell);
    Messaging.void_objc_msgSend (cell.Handle, selRetain);

    return cell;
}

// Method 4

static IntPtr selRetain = Selector.GetHandle ("retain");
static IntPtr selRetainCount = Selector.GetHandle("retainCount");

[Export("copyWithZone:")]
public virtual NSObject CopyWithZone (IntPtr zone)
{
    ImageAndTextCell cell = new ImageAndTextCell () {
        Title = Title,
        Image = Image,
    };

    _refPool.Add (cell);
    Messaging.void_objc_msgSend (cell.Handle, selRetain);

    return cell;
}

public void PeriodicCleanup ()
{
    List<ImageAndTextCell> markedForDelete = new List<ImageAndTextCell> ();

    foreach (ImageAndTextCell cell in _refPool) {
        uint count = Messaging.UInt32_objc_msgSend (cell.Handle, selRetainCount);
        if (count == 1)
            markedForDelete.Add (cell);
    }

    foreach (ImageAndTextCell cell in markedForDelete) {
        _refPool.Remove (cell);
        cell.Dispose ();
    }
}

// Method 5

static IntPtr selCopyWithZone = Selector.GetHandle("copyWithZone:");

[Export("copyWithZone:")]
public virtual NSObject CopyWithZone(IntPtr zone) {
    IntPtr copyHandle = Messaging.IntPtr_objc_msgSendSuper_IntPtr(SuperHandle, selCopyWithZone, zone);
    ImageAndTextCell cell = new ImageAndTextCell(copyHandle) {
        Image = Image,
    };

    _refPool.Add(cell);

    return cell;
}

Method 1: Increases the retain count of the unmanaged object. The unmanaged object will persist persist forever (I think? dealloc never called), and the managed object will be harvested early. Seems to be lose-lose all-around, but runs in practice.

Method 2: Saves a reference of the managed object. The unmanaged object is left alone, and dealloc appears to be invoked at a reasonable time by the caller. At this point the managed object is released and disposed. This seems reasonable, but on the downside the base type's dealloc won't be run (I think?)

Method 3: Increases the retain count and saves a reference. Unmanaged and managed objects leak forever.

Method 4: Extends Method 3 by adding a cleanup function that is run periodically (e.g. during Init of each new ImageAndTextCell object). The cleanup function checks the retain counts of the stored objects. A retain count of 1 means the caller has released it, so we should as well. Should eliminate leaking in theory.

Method 5: Attempt to invoke the copyWithZone method on the base type, and then construct a new ImageAndTextView object with the resulting handle. Seems to do the right thing (the base data is cloned). Internally, NSObject bumps the retain count on objects constructed like this, so we also use the PeriodicCleanup function to release these objects when they're no longer used.

Based on the above, I believe Method 5 is the best approach since it should be the only one that results in a truly correct copy of the base type data, but I don't know if the approach is inherently dangerous (I am also making some assumptions about the underlying implementation of NSObject). So far nothing bad has happened "yet", but if anyone is able to vet my analysis then I would be more confident going forward.

share|improve this question
    
You can get your hands on the retain selector and invoke it on your image. And FWIW returning a reference to a managed object to the runtime without holding on to it yourself is going to get you in the end. The GC can't track references. –  ta.speot.is Nov 4 '12 at 7:48
    
-copyWithZone: is supposed to copy an instance into that zone of memory. I don't know enough Mono for this, but is there any specific way of handling an NSZone? –  CodaFi Nov 4 '12 at 7:49
    
@CodaFi The thing is that the zone argument in Cocoa (Touch) is deprecated, and it is to be ignored, you don't have to occupy yourself superfluously with this. –  user529758 Nov 4 '12 at 7:52
    
@H2CO3, you're absolutely right. I was taken aback at someone actually trying to implement a method involving NSZone. –  CodaFi Nov 4 '12 at 7:58

2 Answers 2

This issue is discussed at some length in Bug 1086

Well, this is a ref-counting/ownership problem:

You create a new MyObject instance in your MyDataSource.GetObjectValue(), then return it to native code, without keeping a reference to it. After returning, you do not own that object anymore, but the managed garbage collector does not know that.

Simply store the objects in a list, like this:

List<MyObject> list;

public MyDataSource ()
{
    list = new List<MyObject> ();
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
        list.Add (new MyObject { Text = "My Row " + i });
    }
}

public override NSObject GetObjectValue (NSTableView tableView,
    NSTableColumn tableColumn, int row)
{
    return list [row];
}

public override int GetRowCount (NSTableView tableView)
{
    return list.Count;
}

However, this does not solve your copyWithZone: problem. Here, storing the cloned objects locally is not an option, this would leak a lot of memory quickly. Instead, you need to call retain on the cloned object. Unfortunately, NSObject.Retain() is internal in MonoMac.dll, but you can just simply do it like this:

static IntPtr selRetain = Selector.GetHandle ("retain");
[Export("copyWithZone:")]
public NSObject CopyWithZone (IntPtr zone)
{
    var cloned = new MyObject { Text = this.Text };
    Messaging.void_objc_msgSend (cloned.Handle, selRetain);
    return cloned;
}

From memory the code in the last example isn't complete, you have to combine the two examples and track the new MyObject in a list (or some other collection) as well.

share|improve this answer
    
The second code block alone seems to be fixing my problem in practice, but I don't understand your last comment. Is retain not sufficient alone? And if I did store objects in a list somewhere, how would the references ever be released? These objects are being cloned in the bowels of Cocoa where I'll mostly never see them. –  Justin Aquadro Nov 4 '12 at 8:11
    
I believe (and my understanding of this is not that great) that any reference to a managed object you return to the native runtime must have at least one reference to it in your application. Otherwise the GC will think the object is ripe for the taking. When the object reference comes back into Mono, it refers to an object that doesn't exist anymore and boom! –  ta.speot.is Nov 4 '12 at 8:18
    
Is the unmanaged code that's calling the copy method guaranteed to also call Dispose on the copied object (via destroy or dealloc or whatever)? That's the only place I can think of to reliably clean up a global object reference pool. –  Justin Aquadro Nov 4 '12 at 8:22
    
@JustinAquadro Not sure, it's been a while since I've done it but I think I kept a list of items in the data source, which you can clean up when the window closes. –  ta.speot.is Nov 4 '12 at 9:50
    
It would appear the answer is "no" if the object is retained. I have updated my question with some analysis of different solutions. At this point it's a matter of not fully knowing whether my solution(s) will be safe or not. –  Justin Aquadro Nov 6 '12 at 6:09
up vote 2 down vote accepted

So far I have not found any evidence of trouble, so I'm comfortable adopting "Method 5" that I outlined in my question update, which I'll duplicate here with some additional explanation:

// An additional constructor
public ImageAndTextCell (IntPtr handle)
    : base(handle)
{
}

// Cocoa Selectors
static IntPtr selRetainCount = Selector.GetHandle("retainCount");
static IntPtr selCopyWithZone = Selector.GetHandle("copyWithZone:");

static List<ImageAndTextCell> _refPool = new List<ImageAndTextCell>();

// Helper method to be called at some future point in managed code to release
// managed instances that are no longer needed.
public void PeriodicCleanup ()
{
    List<ImageAndTextCell> markedForDelete = new List<ImageAndTextCell> ();

    foreach (ImageAndTextCell cell in _refPool) {
        uint count = Messaging.UInt32_objc_msgSend (cell.Handle, selRetainCount);
        if (count == 1)
            markedForDelete.Add (cell);
    }

    foreach (ImageAndTextCell cell in markedForDelete) {
        _refPool.Remove (cell);
        cell.Dispose ();
    }
}

// Overriding the copy method
[Export("copyWithZone:")]
public virtual NSObject CopyWithZone(IntPtr zone) {
    IntPtr copyHandle = Messaging.IntPtr_objc_msgSendSuper_IntPtr(SuperHandle, selCopyWithZone, zone);
    ImageAndTextCell cell = new ImageAndTextCell(copyHandle) {
        Image = Image,
    };

    _refPool.Add(cell);

    return cell;
}

By invoking the copyWithZone: selector on the base object (via SuperHandle), the underlying Cocoa subsystem will clone the unmanaged object and give back the handle to it, with its retain count already set to 1 (standard obj-c copy convention). It's then possible to construct the derived C# object with the cloned object handle, so the cloned instance becomes the backing object. Then it's a simple matter of cloning any managed C# goodies that belong to the derived type.

As ta.speot.is pointed out, it's also necessary to hold onto a reference of the managed type somewhere. Without the reference, the object is a candidate for garbage collection at the end of the method. The unmanaged portion of the object is safe on return because it has a positive retain count from the call to the copy selector. I've chosen to store references in a static List, and then periodically call a cleanup method from other parts of code which will traverse the list, check if the corresponding unmanaged objects have any other owners, and dispose the objects if not. Note that I'm checking for a count of 1 instead of 0, because our copied object was actually retained twice: once by the copy selector, and once by the NSObject constructor. The Monomac runtime system will take care of disposing the unmanaged object when the managed side is disposed/collected.

share|improve this answer
    
Fantastic research. Well done. –  johnrubythecat Oct 19 '14 at 12:13

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