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I want to use the ?: operator intstead of if else

e.g.

var directory = new DirectoryInfo(path);
if (!directory.Exist())
{
    directory.Create();
}
else 
{
    // do nothing
}

I tried to use ?: like this:

var directory = new DirectoryInfo(path);
!directory.Exist() ? directory.Create() : void;

but it says "Invalid expression term void", null also isn't working.

Can anyone tell me a solution?

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11  
You don't need to (and should not) use the ternary operator if you don't have both "if and else", or you don't need the return value. It doesn't make execution faster and doesn't make you look pro, but just make your code messy. – Alvin Wong Nov 4 '12 at 8:04

In you scenario, only having a if condition is better suited.

Just for your understanding, A ternary Operator (?:) needs to result into a value in the right side and also needs a variable in left side to assign the result value e.g.:

    x =  (y== null) ? 0: 1;

This means assign 0 to x when y is null otherwise assign 1.

So in your example/scenario, you may write something like this to result into a directory creation status as below:

    var newDirectoryCreated = (!directory.Exist()) ? directory.Create() : false;

This way, if new directory is created then newDirectoryCreated will assigned with true otherwise false.

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And if they don't actually need a boolean status? Then it's just mucking up the code. =) – J. Steen Nov 4 '12 at 8:08
    
@J.Steen: OP has already written the code with if so I just provided the answer with the reasoning of ?: operator not working and way around to make it working (more from learning perspective). I will add a note in the top. – Yogendra Singh Nov 4 '12 at 8:14

Simply keep the if statement and remove the else clase since you aren't doing anything in there.

You're trying to use the ternary operator which, by definition, must return a value.

From the documentation:

The conditional operator (?:) returns one of two values depending on the value of a Boolean expression.

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That fixes the problem, but doesn't explain why his code doesn't work though. – jalf Nov 4 '12 at 8:01

If your just looking for brevity, you could try this instead:

if (!directory.Exist())
    directory.Create();
share|improve this answer

Ternary operator are not designed to replace if/else They are to simplify assignment and declaration. It should be able to assign the result the statement to something like variable or function. There major use are in assignment or reading.

Something like

var status = !directory.Exist() ? directory.Create() : false;

The correct solution would be to stick to native if condition. The following is enough:

var directory = new DirectoryInfo(path);
if (!directory.Exist())
{
    directory.Create();
}
share|improve this answer
    
It won't do "nothing". It will create the directory if it doesn't exist (or, it would if it compiled) – jalf Nov 4 '12 at 8:02
    
@jalf, Tell me what that void will do. – Starx Nov 4 '12 at 8:04
    
well, like I said, if it compiled. Point is that directory.Create() certainly won't do nothing – jalf Nov 4 '12 at 8:06
    
that can be shorter: var status = directory.Exist() || directory.Create(); – user287107 Nov 4 '12 at 12:55
    
@user287107, Indeed, but we are talking about ternary operator here so... – Starx Nov 4 '12 at 13:27

The ?: operator's behavior is roughly this:

for x ? y : z, it will return y if x is true, and otherwise it will return z.

From this we can deduce a couple of things:

  • both y and z must return something (it won't work if either of them evaluate to void), and
  • y and z must evaluate to the same type. (Imagine you had something like this: var r = x ? y : z;. Which type is r? Is it the type of y or z? We don't know which of them will be returned, but we have to pick a type at compile-time. So they have to return the same type.

In your case, both evaluate to void, which doesn't work. (And if you changed the last part to null, as you said you'd tried, then they evaluate to different types, one of which is void, which breaks both rules)

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I was thinking of ... ? directory.Create() : null, because the OP said that was one of the things he'd tried. Clarified a bit – jalf Nov 4 '12 at 8:11

The conditional operator (?:) musts return one of two values depending on the value of a Boolean expression. So you can stick with if clause instead, it is still simple to understand rather than conditional operator:

var directory = new DirectoryInfo(path);
if (!directory.Exist()) directory.Create();
share|improve this answer
    
@downvoter: care to comment? – Cuong Le Nov 4 '12 at 8:06

The ?: operator is an extention of the if-then-else construction.

The extention is in the then-block and the else-block. Where the then-block and the else-block return void for the if-then-else construciton it must return a type for the ?: operator. An aditional constraint for the types in the ?: operator is that the two types must be identical. This constraint is softened a bit by the fact that automatic casting will be used by the compiler to make the two types identical.

Code using ?: operators is in general shorter but also harder to read. This is one point to consider when replacing the if-then-else construct with the ?: operator. Unless your then-block and else-block are one liners it seldom is worth replacing it with the ?: operator.

The if-then construction is a limited version of the if-then-else construction (or visa versa, the if-then-else construction is an extention of the if-then construction). Since the if-then construction has only one code block, the then-block, it is not possible to replace the if-then construction with the ?: operator. You first have to extend the if-then construct with an empty else-block.

Examples:

// initialising an integer with an if-then construct.
int x = 0;
if (some_condition)
{
    x = 1;
}

Think of this as if the then-blockreturns an integer. It is not possible to use the ?: operator strait away.

// initialising an integer with an if-then-else construct.
int y;
if (some_condition)
{
    y = 1;
}
else
{
    y = 0;
}

Extended the if-then construct to a if-then-else construct and think of the then-block and else-block as returning a integer for witch the types coincidently ;-) match with each other. It is possible to use the ?: operator in this case.

// initialising an integer with a ?: operator.
int z = (some_condition) ? 1 : 0;

About your code:

var directory = new DirectoryInfo(path);
if (!directory.Exist())
{
    directory.Create();
}

In this case I do not see a sensible way to make the then-block returning a value. That makes using the ?: operator impossible or highly complicated with ugly code as a result. My advise, stick to the if-then construct in this case.

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