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I'm getting stranger error when I compile my code. I guess the header files aren't being properly linked because every single one of those variables that are erroring have been specified in 'variables.h' which I properly #include. Strangely enough, if I comment ou the areas in which the variables are used in main.cpp, a whole other slew of errors pop up of the same variables in another file readfile.cpp. Below is the error output, as well as my code for main.cpp and variables.h. Any ideas?

g++ -c main.cpp 
g++ -c readfile.cpp 
g++ -c Objects.cpp 
g++ -o raytracer main.o readfile.o Objects.o
Undefined symbols for architecture x86_64:
  "_depth", referenced from:
      init()    in main.o
      readFile(char const*)in readfile.o
  "_diffuse", referenced from:
      readFile(char const*)in readfile.o
  "_emission", referenced from:
      readFile(char const*)in readfile.o
  "_filename", referenced from:
      init()    in main.o
  "_fov", referenced from:
      init()    in main.o
      initCamera(float*)in readfile.o
  "_height", referenced from:
      init()    in main.o
      readFile(char const*)in readfile.o
  "_lookatx", referenced from:
      init()    in main.o
      initCamera(float*)in readfile.o
  "_lookaty", referenced from:
      init()    in main.o
      initCamera(float*)in readfile.o
  "_lookatz", referenced from:
      init()    in main.o
      initCamera(float*)in readfile.o
  "_lookfromx", referenced from:
      init()    in main.o
      initCamera(float*)in readfile.o
  "_lookfromy", referenced from:
      init()    in main.o
      initCamera(float*)in readfile.o
  "_lookfromz", referenced from:
      init()    in main.o
      initCamera(float*)in readfile.o
  "_maxvertnorms", referenced from:
      init()    in main.o
      readFile(char const*)in readfile.o
  "_maxverts", referenced from:
      init()    in main.o
      readFile(char const*)in readfile.o
  "_shininess", referenced from:
      readFile(char const*)in readfile.o
  "_specular", referenced from:
      readFile(char const*)in readfile.o
  "_spherecount", referenced from:
      init()    in main.o
  "_spheres", referenced from:
      readFile(char const*)in readfile.o
  "_triangles", referenced from:
      readFile(char const*)in readfile.o
  "_tricount", referenced from:
      init()    in main.o
  "_trinormals", referenced from:
      readFile(char const*)in readfile.o
  "_trinormcount", referenced from:
      init()    in main.o
  "_upx", referenced from:
      init()    in main.o
      initCamera(float*)in readfile.o
  "_upy", referenced from:
      init()    in main.o
      initCamera(float*)in readfile.o
  "_upz", referenced from:
      init()    in main.o
      initCamera(float*)in readfile.o
  "_vertexcount", referenced from:
      init()    in main.o
  "_vertexnormcount", referenced from:
      init()    in main.o
  "_vertices", referenced from:
      readFile(char const*)in readfile.o
  "_vertnormals", referenced from:
      readFile(char const*)in readfile.o
  "_width", referenced from:
      init()    in main.o
      readFile(char const*)in readfile.o
ld: symbol(s) not found for architecture x86_64
collect2: ld returned 1 exit status

Below is variables.h..

#include "vertexnormal.h"
#include "sphere.h"
#include "tri.h"
#include "trinormal.h"
#include "vec.h"

#include <string>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

// width and height specify image size
extern float width;
extern float height;

// maximum depth for a ray (level of recursion)
extern int depth;

// the output file to which the image should be written
extern string filename;

// camera specifiations (should i put in a struct?)
extern float lookfromx;
extern float lookfromy;
extern float lookfromz;
extern float lookatx;
extern float lookaty;
extern float lookatz;
extern float upx;
extern float upy;
extern float upz;
extern float fov;

//***************************//
//  Geometry Specifications  //
//***************************//

// specifies the number of vertrices for tri specifications
extern int maxverts;

// specifies the number of vertices with normals for tri specifications
extern int maxvertnorms;

// pile of inputted vertices
// might need to #include glm file                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     
extern vector<vec> vertices;

// pile of inputted vertices with specified normals
extern vector<vertexNormal> vertnormals;

// pile of inputted spheres
extern vector<sphere> spheres;

// pile of inputted triangles
extern vector<tri> triangles;

// pile of inputted triangles using vertices with specified normals 
extern vector<triNormal> trinormals;

extern int vertexcount;
extern int vertexnormcount;
extern int spherecount;
extern int tricount;
extern int trinormcount;

//**************************//
//  Materials Specifiations //
//**************************//

extern float diffuse[3];
extern float specular[3];
extern float shininess;
extern float emission[3];

And here is my main.cpp,

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <fstream>
#include <sstream>

#include "Objects.h"

using namespace std;

#include "readfile.h"
#include "variables.h"


void init() {
    cout << "Reading in scene file... \n";
    cout << "Image size has been set to a " << width << " x " << height << " output. /n";
    cout << "The maximum recursion depth has been set to " << depth << ". \n";
    cout << "The image will be output to " << filename << ".png. \n";

    cout << "The camera has been instantiated with the following properties: \n";
    cout << "\t POSITION: (" << lookfromx << ", " << lookfromy << ", " << lookfromz << ") \n";
    cout << "\t DIRECTION: (" << lookatx << ", " << lookaty << ", " << lookatz << ") \n";
    cout << "\t UP: (" << upx << ", " << upy << ", " << upz << ") \n";
    cout << "\t FIELD OF VIEW: " << fov << " \n";

    cout << "An amount of " << vertexcount << " vertices has been specified with a maximum of " << maxverts << " allowed. \n";
    cout << "An amount of " << vertexnormcount << " vertices with normals has been specified with a maximum of " << maxvertnorms << " allowed. \n"; 

    cout << "An amount of " << spherecount << " spheres have been specified. \n";
    cout << "An amount of " << tricount << " triangles have been specified. \n";
    cout << "An amount of " << trinormcount << " triangles with calculated vertex normals have been specified. \n";
}


int main (int argc, char * argv[]) {
    readFile(argv[1]);
    init();
    return 0;
}
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closed as too localized by jogojapan, BЈовић, alestanis, brimborium, jacktheripper Nov 4 '12 at 12:27

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Would you please reduce the code to a smaller example that exhibits the same behaviour? Far over 90% of your question is irrelevant to the actual problem. By eliminating code, you might even be able to find the problem yourself. –  stefan Nov 4 '12 at 8:11
    
That is a truly spectacular number of global variables. After you've figured out how to use global variables correctly, the very next thing you should learn is how to structure your code so you don't need to use them. You really aren't going to get very far with this style of coding. Perhaps read up on object orientation, it's what the C++ language was invented for. Or even just read about function parameters and return values. –  john Nov 4 '12 at 8:44
    
@john Yeah, I understand it's quite a bit of global vars, but a lot of graphics applications run as a state machine so there's a tendency to have an inflated number of variables to keep track of. About a fourth of the variables up there are for debugging purposes and the only variables that I can agree may be implemented better are the camera specification parameters. I did it this way because I'm just trying to get a text parser up and running as quickly as possible. Regardless, thanks again for all the help and advice. It works now. –  user1257724 Nov 4 '12 at 9:32
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try this:

  1. Open up your variables.h header file.
  2. Copy ALL of the extern variable declarations.
  3. Open up your main.cpp file.
  4. Paste all your declarations copied from (2).
  5. In the same main.cpp remove the keyword extern from each declaration.
  6. Save all your files.
  7. Lookup how extern works. Something tells me you missed that in your studies.

Ok, this has been covered in SO what, a few thousand times, but for the OP:

Declaring the Existence of a Variable

// DECLARE myvar, an int variable. no storage has been set aside
//  this is simply telling the compiler this thing exists.. somewhere.
extern int myvar;

Defining The Existence of a Variable

// DEFINE myvar, an int variable. storage *is* set aside here.
//  only ONE of these, by this name, can be in your global 
//  namespace in your program.
int myvar = 0;

Traditionally, extern declarations are in headers, but definitions are always in c/cpp files. There must be a matching definition for any extern-declared variable that is used in your program.

How this fits with your situation All of your variables were declared in variables.h, but the were never defined anyway. By telling you to copy/paste all those declarations into a source file (any will do; I chose main.cpp because it was already in your project), and then removing the extern keyword in that source file (not the header), you were essentially defining where they all officially existed. Now all those references to extern'ed variables in your other source files finally have something to hook up to at link time.

Sidebar In the c/cpp file where your variables are being defined, make sure you initialize them to proper values. This is the one and only place you can do it. you can NOT do it on any extern declaration. It can only be done on a definition.

Header File

extern int myvar; // note: no initial value.

Source File

int myvar = 0; // note: initialized to zero (0)

I hope that made at least a little sense.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks WhozCraig for the response. I'd like to keep them out of my main.cpp, if possible. Would there be a way around it if I removed the extern keyword from 'variables.h'? –  user1257724 Nov 4 '12 at 8:24
    
'I'd like to keep them out of main.cpp if possible'. They have to go somewhere, if not main.cpp then another .cpp file. Maybe even create a .cpp file called globals.cpp. And no just removing extern will not work. But of course the real answer is don't use global variables at all. Maybe you can use this as a learning experience, try to rewrite your code so you don't need globals. As your comment says putting them in a struct would be a start. Then all you need to learn is how to pass variables from one function to another. –  john Nov 4 '12 at 8:28
    
@KevinPamplona: No, that leads to multiple definitions. Keep in mind that #include literally just includes the contents of a file - each time you #include a definition you get a new one. Keep extern in the header, then add the definitions (without extern) in a relevant .cpp file. Or better yet: don't use global variables at all. –  molbdnilo Nov 4 '12 at 8:29
    
Yeah, what John said. if nothing else create a variables.cpp file and throw them all in there, but keep the extern qualifier in front of all the ones in variables.h And during your swearing while having to put all those extern decls back in variables.h, think of it as motivation to not have so many global vars =) –  WhozCraig Nov 4 '12 at 8:30
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extern float lookfromx;
extern float lookfromy;
extern float lookfromz;
extern float lookatx;
extern float lookaty;
extern float lookatz;

These are simply declarations. You need to define these variables somewhere in the program (in variables.cpp, for example). To make these definitions you can either

  • remove the extern keyword

  • add an initialiizer ( = value; )

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Armen. It worked, sorta. Now I'm getting duplicate errors such as 'duplicate symbol _lookfromx in: main.o readfile.o duplicate symbol _lookfromy in: main.o readfile.o' --- To remedy this, I tried removing #include "variables.h" from readfile.cpp, but then I get "not declared" errors. How can I remedy the duplicate problem? –  user1257724 Nov 4 '12 at 8:16
    
@KevinPamplona: You have to leave the declarations in the .h file and have the definitions in the .cpp file. –  Armen Tsirunyan Nov 4 '12 at 8:30
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Your variable.h file simply makes your variables portable across other files in the global scope, but they still need to be declared. Make sure to declare the actual variables in your main file(normal method of initialization).

The extern keyword declares a variable or function and specifies that it has external linkage (its name is visible from files other than the one in which it's defined). When modifying a variable, extern specifies that the variable has static duration (it is allocated when the program begins and deallocated when the program ends). The variable or function may be defined in another source file, or later in the same file. Declarations of variables and functions at file scope are external by default.

Read more on the extern keyword

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Need4Sleep. I removed the extern keyword as Armen below suggested, but now I'm getting duplicate symbol errors. Removing #include "variables.h" in readfile.cpp didn't work. Any ideas? –  user1257724 Nov 4 '12 at 8:20
    
make sure your variables.h file is not included multiple times, this could be the problem for your duplicate. Add header guards that you would usually see in a class header file –  Syntactic Fructose Nov 4 '12 at 8:24
    
'variables.h' is only declared once in readfile and main, but i don't have any header guards--could that be the problem? –  user1257724 Nov 4 '12 at 8:25
    
Doesnt hurt to add them, give it a try. Shouldnt take more than a minute –  Syntactic Fructose Nov 4 '12 at 8:26
    
Hm, I encased variables.h in a header guard, but the duplicate error still sticks around. –  user1257724 Nov 4 '12 at 8:32
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