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I would like to use a std::atomic<std::shared_ptr> in my code so that the shared_ptr can be atomicaly updated, but I have a problem when accessing the shared_ptr. The load() method on the atomic seems to reduce the ref-count on the shared_ptr, so that I can't actually use the object without it being deallocated.

Here is a simplified piece of code that shows the problem...

typedef shared_ptr<MyClass> MyClassPtr;
typedef atomic<MyClassPtr> MyClassAtomicPtr;

// 1.
MyClassPtr ptr( new MyClass() );
printf("1. use_count=%d\n", ptr.use_count());

// 2. 
MyClassAtomicPtr atomicPointer(ptr);
printf("2. use_count=%d\n", ptr.use_count());

// 3.
{
    MyClassPtr p = atomicPointer.load();
    printf("3a. use_count=%d\n", ptr.use_count());
}
printf("3b. use_count=%d\n", ptr.use_count());

// 4.
{
    MyClassPtr p = atomicPointer.load();
    printf("4a. use_count=%d\n", ptr.use_count());
}
printf("4b. use_count=%d\n", ptr.use_count());

The output of this is:

1. use_count=1
2. use_count=2
3a. use_count=2
3b. use_count=1
4a. use_count=1
4b. use_count=-572662307

I understand steps 1 and 2. But at step 3, I would expect the assignment to the shared_ptr to increase the ref-count to 3, and then when it goes out of scope for the ref-count to go back down to 2. But in fact it stays at 2 when assigned and then decreases to 1 when the shared_ptr goes out of scope. Similarly in step 4, where the ref-count goes to zero and the object is deleted.

So my question is: how can I access and use the shared_ptr managed by the atomic without destroying it?

(I was compiling with Visual Studio 2012 Version 11.0.50727.1 RTMREL)

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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I believe the standard way to atomically load and store shared pointers are to use the functions in §20.7.2.5[util.smartptr.shared.atomic]. It seems only libc++ of clang support them:

template<class T> bool atomic_is_lock_free(const shared_ptr<T>* p);
template<class T> shared_ptr<T> atomic_load(const shared_ptr<T>* p);
template<class T> shared_ptr<T> atomic_load_explicit(const shared_ptr<T>* p, memory_order mo);
template<class T> void atomic_store(shared_ptr<T>* p, shared_ptr<T> r);
template<class T> void atomic_store_explicit(shared_ptr<T>* p, shared_ptr<T> r, memory_order mo);
template<class T> shared_ptr<T> atomic_exchange(shared_ptr<T>* p, shared_ptr<T> r);
template<class T> shared_ptr<T> atomic_exchange_explicit(shared_ptr<T>* p, shared_ptr<T> r, memory_order mo);
template<class T> bool atomic_compare_exchange_weak(shared_ptr<T>* p, shared_ptr<T>* v, shared_ptr<T> w);
template<class T> bool atomic_compare_exchange_strong(shared_ptr<T>* p, shared_ptr<T>* v, shared_ptr<T> w);
template<class T> bool atomic_compare_exchange_weak_explicit(shared_ptr<T>* p, shared_ptr<T>* v, shared_ptr<T> w, memory_order success, memory_order failure);
template<class T> bool atomic_compare_exchange_strong_explicit(shared_ptr<T>* p, shared_ptr<T>* v, shared_ptr<T> w, memory_order success, memory_order failure);

So you code could be written as:

auto ptr = std::make_shared<MyClass>();
printf("1. use_count=%d\n", ptr.use_count());

{
    auto p = std::atomic_load(&ptr);
    printf("3a. use_count=%d\n", ptr.use_count());
}

printf("3b. use_count=%d\n", ptr.use_count());

{
    auto p = std::atomic_load(&ptr);
    printf("3a. use_count=%d\n", ptr.use_count());
}

printf("4b. use_count=%d\n", ptr.use_count());

But I can't find such supports listed on MSDN, so the best you could do is to use a mutex. (Actually, the implementation of these functions in libc++ uses a mutex too.)

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Thank you. I had tried the atomic_load() functions as well, and I had seen that they didn't work either. As you say, it looks like they do not have the specializations for shared_ptr that they are supposed to have in VS2012. If they were there though, would you have to call them using atomic_load(&ptr), or would it also work with an atomic<shared_ptr> as well? –  Richard Shepherd Nov 4 '12 at 13:20
    
My mistake: it looks to me as if the atomic_load specializations are there. This is from the <memory> header: shared_ptr<_Ty> atomic_load(const shared_ptr<_Ty> *_Ptr) and it looks like it's implemented with a spin_lock. –  Richard Shepherd Nov 4 '12 at 13:36
    
I can confirm that this does compile and run as expected with VC++ 2012 RTM – this is merely a documentation bug. –  ildjarn Nov 6 '12 at 22:58
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You can't use std::shared_ptr<T> as template argument type for std::atomic<T>. "The type of the template argument T shall be trivially copyable." (§29.5 1 in N3290) std::shared_ptr<T> is not trivially copyable.

Apparently, in your example std::memcpy (or something like that) is used to copy the std::shared_ptr and afterwards the destructor is invoked. That's the reason for the decrementing reference count. In the last step, the object is deleted.

A solution is to use a std::mutex to protect your std::shared_ptr.

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1  
Rather than a mutex, use the free functions that manage atomic access to std::shared_ptr. –  Pete Becker Nov 4 '12 at 11:07
    
Thank you, nosid, for the explanation of why the ref-count was not working as I had expected. I imagine that if the template specializations were there (refered to in KennyTM's answer), that it would then work? –  Richard Shepherd Nov 4 '12 at 13:24
    
@Pete Becker: When you talk about the 'free functions' do you mean the atomic_load specializations discussed in KennyTM's answer, or something else? Unfortunately those specializations are not there with VS2012, but if there's another way to manage a (more efficient) atomic update to a shared_ptr without a mutex I would be very interested. –  Richard Shepherd Nov 4 '12 at 13:27
2  
They are probably there; they're certainly in the code I wrote for Dinkumware, and that's the library that Microsoft ships. Try them and see; not being in MSDN means only that they're not in MSDN. –  Pete Becker Nov 4 '12 at 16:38
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