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I want to use NSTask to simulate the Terminal to run commands. The codes as follows. It can get input in loop and return the process output.

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
  @autoreleasepool {      
    while (1) {
        char str[80] = {0};
        scanf("%s", str);
        NSString *cmdstr = [NSString stringWithUTF8String:str];

        NSTask *task = [NSTask new];
        [task setLaunchPath:@"/bin/sh"];
        [task setArguments:[NSArray arrayWithObjects:@"-c", cmdstr, nil]];

        NSPipe *pipe = [NSPipe pipe];
        [task setStandardOutput:pipe];

        [task launch];

        NSData *data = [[pipe fileHandleForReading] readDataToEndOfFile];

        [task waitUntilExit];

        NSString *string = [[NSString alloc] initWithData:data encoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding];
        NSLog(@"%@", string);

    }
}

My question is: when a loop is end, the running environment restore to the initialization state. For example, the default running path is /Users/apple, and I run cd / to change the path to /, and then run pwd, it return the /Users/apple rather than the /.

So how can I use NSTask to simulate the Terminal completely ?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

cd and pwd are shell built-in commands. If you execute the task

/bin/sh -c "cd /"

there is no way of getting the changed working directory back to the calling process. The same problem exists if you want to set variables MYVAR=myvalue.

You could try to parse these lines separately and update the environment. But what about multi-line commands like

for file in *.txt
do
    echo $file
done

You cannot emulate that by sending each line to separate NSTask processes.

The only thing you could do is to start a single /bin/sh process with NSTask, and feed all the input lines to the standard input of that process. But then you can not use readDataToEndOfFile to read the output, but you have to read asynchronously (using [[pipe fileHandleForReading] waitForDataInBackgroundAndNotify]).

So in short: you can simulate the Terminal only by running a (single) shell.

ADDED: Perhaps you can use the following as a starting point for your app. (I have omitted all error checking.)

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    @autoreleasepool {

        // Commands are read from standard input:
        NSFileHandle *input = [NSFileHandle fileHandleWithStandardInput];

        NSPipe *inPipe = [NSPipe new]; // pipe for shell input
        NSPipe *outPipe = [NSPipe new]; // pipe for shell output

        NSTask *task = [NSTask new];
        [task setLaunchPath:@"/bin/sh"];
        [task setStandardInput:inPipe];
        [task setStandardOutput:outPipe];
        [task launch];

        // Wait for standard input ...
        [input waitForDataInBackgroundAndNotify];
        // ... and wait for shell output.
        [[outPipe fileHandleForReading] waitForDataInBackgroundAndNotify];

        // Wait asynchronously for standard input.
        // The block is executed as soon as some data is available on standard input.
        [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserverForName:NSFileHandleDataAvailableNotification
                                                          object:input queue:nil
                                                      usingBlock:^(NSNotification *note)
         {
             NSData *inData = [input availableData];
             if ([inData length] == 0) {
                 // EOF on standard input.
                 [[inPipe fileHandleForWriting] closeFile];
             } else {
                 // Read from standard input and write to shell input pipe.
                 [[inPipe fileHandleForWriting] writeData:inData];

                 // Continue waiting for standard input.
                 [input waitForDataInBackgroundAndNotify];
             }
         }];

        // Wait asynchronously for shell output.
        // The block is executed as soon as some data is available on the shell output pipe. 
        [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserverForName:NSFileHandleDataAvailableNotification
                                                          object:[outPipe fileHandleForReading] queue:nil
                                                      usingBlock:^(NSNotification *note)
         {
             // Read from shell output
             NSData *outData = [[outPipe fileHandleForReading] availableData];
             NSString *outStr = [[NSString alloc] initWithData:outData encoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding];
             NSLog(@"output: %@", outStr);

             // Continue waiting for shell output.
             [[outPipe fileHandleForReading] waitForDataInBackgroundAndNotify];
         }];

        [task waitUntilExit];

    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, Martin. But how can I start a single shell with NSTask? Can you provider some code sample? –  Tom Jacky Nov 4 '12 at 12:36
    
@TomJacky: You would create and launch the task just once, and use a pipe for the standard input as you did for standard output. - Perhaps you can be a bit more specific what you actually want to do. Is it really only a command line program that reads commands from the standard input and executes the commands? –  Martin R Nov 4 '12 at 12:53
    
Yes, it is only a command line program to do that. In short, what I wana to do is emulate a Terminal shell. I do not know how to read input commands in loop and give these command to the pipe of std. input and read outputs from the pipe of std. output. Are there any example codes on then net? –  Tom Jacky Nov 4 '12 at 13:05
    
@TomJacky: What do you mean exactly with "emulate a Terminal"? Where is the difference between your program and /bin/sh or /bin/bash ? –  Martin R Nov 4 '12 at 13:21
    
Sorry, I did not explain enough. Exactly, I'm using the the /bin/sh. The meaing of "emulate a Terminal" is that I want to input a command to /bin/sh and get the output, and then send another command to it and get another output, and that cycle repeats, just like directly interacting with the sh or bash. What i don't know is that how can I use a single NSTask process to handle the loop commands input and their output? –  Tom Jacky Nov 4 '12 at 13:46

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