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Scala doesn't have type-safe enums like Java has. If I have a set of related constants then what is the best way in Scala to represent those constants?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 117 down vote accepted

http://www.scala-lang.org/docu/files/api/scala/Enumeration.html

Example use

  object Main extends App {

    object WeekDay extends Enumeration {
      type WeekDay = Value
      val Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri, Sat, Sun = Value
    }
    import WeekDay._

    def isWorkingDay(d: WeekDay) = ! (d == Sat || d == Sun)

    WeekDay.values filter isWorkingDay foreach println
  }
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18  
@Germán: if you want people to believe you and learn from this, you should at least tell us why. Or provide an URL for more information. –  Joachim Sauer Aug 24 '09 at 13:47
32  
@Germán - skaffman is just providing a simple example, not a enterprise-ready system. Furthermore this is taken from the Scala-lang site itself! And post-furthermore, saying Application is evil is ridiculous. –  oxbow_lakes Aug 24 '09 at 13:54
3  
Indeed. Anyway, the use of Application here is purely to serve as a container for the example, not the enumeration itself. –  skaffman Aug 24 '09 at 14:05
2  
Well, Application is not "Evil" but you must know the trade-offs of using it. Not worth it, unless is an extremely simple example (like this :) ) –  GClaramunt May 11 '10 at 14:57
7  
This limitation won't be true anymore in the next Scala version: bit.ly/fqt2Pj –  Eric Dec 28 '10 at 21:59

I must say that the example copied out of the Scala documentation by skaffman above is of limited utility in practice (you might as well use case objects).

In order to get something most closely resembling a Java Enum (i.e. with sensible toString and valueOf methods -- perhaps you are persisting the enum values to a database) you need to modify it a bit. If you had used skaffman's code:

WeekDay.valueOf("Sun") //returns None
WeekDay.Tue.toString   //returns Weekday(2)

Whereas using the following declaration:

object WeekDay extends Enumeration {
  type WeekDay = Value
  val Mon = Value("Mon")
  val Tue = Value("Tue") 
  ... etc
}

You get more sensible results:

WeekDay.valueOf("Sun") //returns Some(Sun)
WeekDay.Tue.toString   //returns Tue
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2  
Thanks, those are useful additions. –  Jesper Aug 24 '09 at 11:54
9  
I'm impressed. I can hardly get an answer about Scala with more than 10 upvotes, and you managed to get 17, in 3 hours, with another answer accepted! :-) –  Daniel C. Sobral Aug 24 '09 at 14:45
88  
I have my wife and my children, oxbow_puddles and oxbow_ponds clicking furiously on my behalf –  oxbow_lakes Aug 24 '09 at 14:51
6  
Btw. valueOf method is now dead :-( –  greenoldman Nov 23 '11 at 12:29
20  
@macias valueOf's replacement is withName, which doesn't return an Option, and throws a NSE if there is no match. What the! –  Bluu Jan 31 '12 at 19:00

There are many ways of doing.

1) Use symbols. It won't give you any type safety, though, aside from not accepting non-symbols where a symbol is expected. I'm only mentioning it here for completeness. Here's an example of usage:

def update(what: Symbol, where: Int, newValue: Array[Int]): MatrixInt =
  what match {
    case 'row => replaceRow(where, newValue)
    case 'col | 'column => replaceCol(where, newValue)
    case _ => throw new IllegalArgumentException
  }

// At REPL:   
scala> val a = unitMatrixInt(3)
a: teste7.MatrixInt =
/ 1 0 0 \
| 0 1 0 |
\ 0 0 1 /

scala> a('row, 1) = a.row(0)
res41: teste7.MatrixInt =
/ 1 0 0 \
| 1 0 0 |
\ 0 0 1 /

scala> a('column, 2) = a.row(0)
res42: teste7.MatrixInt =
/ 1 0 1 \
| 0 1 0 |
\ 0 0 0 /

2) Using class Enumeration:

object Dimension extends Enumeration {
  type Dimension = Value
  val Row, Column = Value
}

or, if you need to serialize or display it:

object Dimension extends Enumeration("Row", "Column") {
  type Dimension = Value
  val Row, Column = Value
}

This can be used like this:

def update(what: Dimension, where: Int, newValue: Array[Int]): MatrixInt =
  what match {
    case Row => replaceRow(where, newValue)
    case Column => replaceCol(where, newValue)
  }

// At REPL:
scala> a(Row, 2) = a.row(1)
<console>:13: error: not found: value Row
       a(Row, 2) = a.row(1)
         ^

scala> a(Dimension.Row, 2) = a.row(1)
res1: teste.MatrixInt =
/ 1 0 0 \
| 0 1 0 |
\ 0 1 0 /

scala> import Dimension._
import Dimension._

scala> a(Row, 2) = a.row(1)
res2: teste.MatrixInt =
/ 1 0 0 \
| 0 1 0 |
\ 0 1 0 /

Unfortunately, it doesn't ensure that all matches are accounted for. If I forgot to put Row or Column in the match, the Scala compiler wouldn't have warned me. So it gives me some type safety, but not as much as can be gained.

3) Case objects:

sealed abstract class Dimension
case object Row extends Dimension
case object Column extends Dimension

Now, if I leave out a case on a match, the compiler will warn me:

MatrixInt.scala:70: warning: match is not exhaustive!
missing combination         Column

    what match {
    ^
one warning found

It's used pretty much the same way, and doesn't even need an import:

scala> val a = unitMatrixInt(3)
a: teste3.MatrixInt =
/ 1 0 0 \
| 0 1 0 |
\ 0 0 1 /

scala> a(Row,2) = a.row(0)
res15: teste3.MatrixInt =
/ 1 0 0 \
| 0 1 0 |
\ 1 0 0 /

You might wonder, then, why ever use an Enumeration instead of case objects. As a matter of fact, case objects do have advantages many times, such as here. The Enumeration class, though, has many Collection methods, such as elements (iterator on Scala 2.8), which returns an Iterator, map, flatMap, filter, etc.

This answer is essentially a selected parts from this article in my blog.

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A slightly less verbose way of declaring named enumerations:

object WeekDay extends Enumeration("Sun", "Mon", "Tue", "Wed", "Thu", "Fri", "Sat") {
  type WeekDay = Value
  val Sun, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri, Sat = Value
}

WeekDay.valueOf("Wed") // returns Some(Wed)
WeekDay.Fri.toString   // returns Fri

Of course the problem here is that you will need to keep the ordering of the names and vals in sync which is easier to do if name and val are declared on the same line.

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5  
I didn't know that! –  oxbow_lakes Aug 24 '09 at 13:46
4  
This looks cleaner at first glance, but has the disadvantage of requiring the maintainer to keep the oder of both lists in sync. For the days of week example, it doesn't appear likely. But in general, the a new value could be inserted, or one deleted and the two lists could be out of sync, in which case, subtle bugs could be introduced. –  Brent Foust May 23 '13 at 22:02

You can use a sealed abstract class instead of the enumeration, for example:

sealed abstract class Constraint(val name: String, val verifier: Int => Boolean)

case object NotTooBig extends Constraint("NotTooBig", (_ < 1000))
case object NonZero extends Constraint("NonZero", (_ != 0))
case class NotEquals(x: Int) extends Constraint("NotEquals " + x, (_ != x))

object Main {

  def eval(ctrs: Seq[Constraint])(x: Int): Boolean =
    (true /: ctrs){ case (accum, ctr) => accum && ctr.verifier(x) }

  def main(args: Array[String]) {
    val ctrs = NotTooBig :: NotEquals(5) :: Nil
    val evaluate = eval(ctrs) _

    println(evaluate(3000))
    println(evaluate(3))
    println(evaluate(5))
  }

}
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Sealed trait with case objects is also a possibility. –  Ashalynd Oct 9 '13 at 16:20

You could try my "CaseEnum"

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