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I have an ajax call that should be executed when and only when the certain flag is set somewhere else in the code.

I cannot make this call directly in the function that sets the flag because I do not need to make this call each time when flag is set.

It is a bit hard to explain so the best illustration I can think of is something like:

The wolf can eat the Red Hat when and only when she is in her grandma's house. However not every time she comes to this house, there is a wolf to eat her. From the other side each time when she is here and the wolf is here, the wolf will eat her.

I wonder, can I use $.when(theFlag) for this purpose?

var theRedHatIsHere = false;

function waitForRedHat()
{
.....
   theRedHatIsHere = true;
}

function wolfIsHungry(link)
{
   $.when(theRedHatIsHere)
   {
       $.ajax({
                type: "POST",
                url: "php/eatredhat.php?",
                data: ddd,
                async: false,
                success: function(msg){
                        console.log( "Eaten" );
                        window.location.href = link;
                }
        });                         
   }
}
share|improve this question
1  
There might be a way to do it with $.when (which expects a promise object, not a boolean), but why don't you just use an if statement: if(theRedHatIsHere) ? –  Felix Kling Nov 4 '12 at 9:40
    
I want to wait till it happens, because when it happens I need to make this call. –  Flot2011 Nov 4 '12 at 9:41
    
Don't make it too complicated. I would just call a function whenever you change the state (redhat or wolf here) and which makes the Ajax call when both are true. –  Felix Kling Nov 4 '12 at 9:44
1  
Instead of setting theRedHatIsHere = true; how about firing custom event $(document).trigger( "theRedHatIsHere" );? –  freakish Nov 4 '12 at 9:47
    
@freakish still the same problem, though a custom event is cooler(+1). Not each time the Red Hat is here she should be/can be eaten –  Flot2011 Nov 4 '12 at 9:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use custom events or Publish/Subscribe pattern instead of bending $.when to do something that is not supposed to do. It is a well known pattern, it helps decouple your components and you have the flexibility for example to have multiple subscribers to the event, stop listening to the event at some point or reacting to it only once.

Subscribe to a custom event with jQuery.on

$(document).on('WolfIsHome', function(){
   $(document).on('WolfGotHungry', function(){
       $(document).on('RedHatArrived', function()
            $.ajax({
                type: "POST",
                url: "php/eatredhat.php?",
                data: ddd,
                async: false,
                success: function(msg){
                        console.log( "Eaten" );
                        window.location.href = link;
                }
            });
      }
  });
});

whenever the wolf gets hungry, instead of setting that boolean value just raise that custom event:

$(document).trigger("WolfIsHome"); // trigger in your logic when the wolf is home

$(document).trigger("WolfGotHungry"); //trigger wolfhungry which will register a subscriber to RedHat arrival event

//and somewhere else in the code
// if RedHatArrived and Wolf is not hungry then nothing will happen 
// because there won't be registered subscribers to her arrival
$(document).trigger("RedHatArrived"); 
share|improve this answer
    
I know exactly when the wolf gets hungry, my problem is, when it happens, to wait till the Red Hat comes and then and only then to eat her. –  Flot2011 Nov 4 '12 at 12:53
    
it's still the same logic .. trigger an event called "RedHatCame" - as opposed to setting the boolean to true - and let the subscriber react to that event –  kabaros Nov 4 '12 at 12:58
    
see my edit to include RedHatArrived event that only get listened to if WolfGotHungry –  kabaros Nov 4 '12 at 13:02
    
There is a difference between 1) get notified when the Red Hat comes and then to eat her, if I am hungry and 2) when I am hungry, I will wait till she comes and then will eat her. In the first case he will probably eat her sometimes, in the second case he will eat her for sure sometimes. –  Flot2011 Nov 4 '12 at 13:03
    
what do you mean "sometimes", in both scenarios he will eat her if he gets hungry and she arrives afterwards .. I don't see the difference. The only problem with the logic itself is that it won't work if the wolf gets hungry after her arrival. –  kabaros Nov 4 '12 at 13:20
var theRedHatIsHere = $.Deferred();

function waitForRedHat()
{
.....
   theRedHatIsHere.resolve();
}

function wolfIsHungry(link)
{
   $.when(theRedHatIsHere).then(function() {
       $.ajax({
                type: "POST",
                url: "php/eatredhat.php?",
                data: ddd,
                async: false,
                success: function(msg){
                        console.log( "Eaten" );
                        window.location.href = link;
                }
        });                         
   });
}

One of drawbacks here is that you'll be able to trigger the request just once.

share|improve this answer
    
Were it possible to use this mechanism multiple times, that is exactly what I am looking for. Is there any option to "unresolve" theReadHatIsHere after it was resolved? –  Flot2011 Nov 4 '12 at 10:05
    
@Flot2011: nope. It's actually a feature, that deferred's state is immutable. So I doubt so –  zerkms Nov 4 '12 at 10:07
    
+1 for a nice try. thanks –  Flot2011 Nov 4 '12 at 10:09
    
What if you had a module build them? –  Travis J Nov 4 '12 at 10:26
    
Is there a reason for $.when here? I think it can be eliminated since theRedHatIsHere is already a deferred. –  pimvdb Nov 4 '12 at 10:30

There is something you can do here. Instead of using a global value for theRedHatIsHere, you can save it in an input element. Like <input type="hidden" id="theRedHatIsHere" value="0"/>

Now once this value is updated, fire an event. You can bind it as:

$(function () {
    $('#theRedHatIsHere').on("change", function () {
        if ($(this).val() == 1 && wolfIsHungry == 1) {
            $.ajax({
                type: "POST",
                url: "php/eatredhat.php?",
                data: ddd,
                async: false,
                success: function (msg) {
                    console.log("Eaten");
                    window.location.href = link; // dont know where this link is being sent from
                }
            });
        }
    });
});

How does that sound?

share|improve this answer
    
As I said, not each time the Red Hat is here, the wolf is here to eat her. I can add a flag inside wolfIsHungry, to test that he is really hungry, but then I will end doing a lot of useless calls. –  Flot2011 Nov 4 '12 at 9:55
    
how are you determining that if the wolf is really hungry or not? –  Pulkit Mittal Nov 4 '12 at 10:00
    
i am usually calling this function from the place where I know that. –  Flot2011 Nov 4 '12 at 10:07

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