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i am a newbie in python and facing issue in getting this output

 a = [('textVerify', 'AH', 'SELECT SERVICES'), ('textVerify', 'F7', 'test1>'),('audioVerify', '091;0'), ('imageVerify', 'duck.gif'),('imageVerify', 'egg.gif')]

i want to create a new list which should hold all the 0th unique element like

  audioVerify,imageVerify,textVerify

so the result expected is

 ['textVerify',(('AH', 'SELECT SERVICES'), ('F7', 'test1>'))  'audioVerify', ('091;0'),  ('imageVerify', ('duck.gif','egg.gif')]
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What have you tried so far? –  Pedro Romano Nov 4 '12 at 13:21
2  
That's not an appropriate data structure. A dictionary would make much more sense, especially a defaultdict. –  Tim Pietzcker Nov 4 '12 at 13:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You'd better use a defaultdict for this:

>>> from collections import defaultdict
>>> d = defaultdict(list)
>>> for item in a:
...     d[item[0]].append(item[1:])
...
>>> d
defaultdict(<class 'list'>, {'textVerify': [('AH', 'SELECT SERVICES'), 
('F7', 'est1>')], 'imageVerify': [('duck.gif',), ('egg.gif',)], 
'audioVerify': [('091;0',)]})

Now you can access its elements by name/index:

>>> d['textVerify']
[('AH', 'SELECT SERVICES'), ('F7', 'test1>')]
>>> d['textVerify'][0][0]
'AH'

If you need to preserve the order of the dictionary keys, you can use an OrderedDict, together with the .setdefault() method, as described by Ashwini Chaudhary:

>>> d = OrderedDict()
>>> for x in a:
...     d.setdefault(x[0],[]).append(x[1:])
...
>>> d
OrderedDict([('textVerify', [('AH', 'SELECT SERVICES'), ('F7', 'test1>')]), 
('audioVerify', [('091;0',)]), ('imageVerify', [('duck.gif',), ('egg.gif',)])])
share|improve this answer
    
+1, beat me to it. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Nov 4 '12 at 13:25
    
me too, apparently +1 –  Burhan Khalid Nov 4 '12 at 13:27
    
though dict.setdefault() is kinda faster than defauldict(). –  Ashwini Chaudhary Nov 4 '12 at 13:29
    
on using this how to preserver the order of dict entry: –  Ragav Nov 5 '12 at 5:43
1  
@Ragav: If order is relevant, you can use an OrderedDict. I've edited my answer. –  Tim Pietzcker Nov 5 '12 at 10:31

Using dict.setdefault(), this is slightly faster than defaultdict() at least for small lists.:

>>> a
[('textVerify', 'AH', 'SELECT SERVICES'), ('textVerify', 'F7', 'test1>'), ('audioVerify', '091;0'), ('imageVerify', 'duck.gif'), ('imageVerify', 'egg.gif')]
>>> d={}
>>> for x in a:
...     d.setdefault(x[0],[]).append(x[1:])
... 
>>> d
{'audioVerify': [('091;0',)], 'textVerify': [('AH', 'SELECT SERVICES'), ('F7', 'test1>')], 'imageVerify': [('duck.gif',), ('egg.gif',)]}

>>> d["audioVerify"]
[('091;0',)]
share|improve this answer
>>> from collections import defaultdict
>>> d = defaultdict(list)
>>> _ = [d[i[0]].append(i[1:]) for i in a]
>>> d['textVerify']
[('AH', 'SELECT SERVICES'), ('F7', 'test1>')]
share|improve this answer
a = [('textVerify', 'AH', 'SELECT SERVICES'), ('textVerify', 'F7', 'test1>'),('audioVerify', '091;0'), ('imageVerify', 'duck.gif'),('imageVerify', 'egg.gif')]

c=set(i[0] for i in a)
d=dict()
for i in c:
        m=[]
        for v in a:
                if v[0]==i:
                        m.extend(list(v[1:]))
        if len(m) !=0:
                d[i]=m

print(d)
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