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Ok I must have got the title terribly wrong. More code, less words:

public class Manager<T> where T : Control, new()
{
    void Manage()
    {
        Do(t => IsVisible(t));
    }

    bool IsVisible(T t)
    {
        return t.Visible;
    }

    S Do<S>(Func<T, S> operation)
    {
        return operation(new T());
    }
}

The compiler is happy about Do. It can infer the T type easily. Now lets say I have this:

public static class Util
{
    static void Manage()
    {
        Do(t => IsVisible(t)); //wiggly line here
    }

    static bool IsVisible<T>(T t) where T : Control
    {
        return t.Visible;
    }

    static S Do<S, T>(Func<T, S> operation) where T : Control, new()
    {
        return operation(new T());
    }
}

The compiler wants types to be explicitly typed now. Here is what I think:

In the first class T was easily inferable from IsVisible method which had T overload and T is known all over the Manager class, no big deal. But in the second case T is specified as a generic constraint on the method and may be that's harder to infer. Ok.

But this doesn't work either:

public static class Util
{
    static void Manage()
    {
        Do(t => IsVisible(t)); //still wiggly line
    }

    static bool IsVisible(Control t)
    {
        return t.Visible;
    }

    static S Do<S, T>(Func<T, S> operation) where T : Control, new()
    {
        return operation(new T());
    }
}
  1. Why doesn't compiler infer T in the last case?

  2. More importantly, how different is the last case from the first? In the first case compiler have to infer it from IsVisible method and then go all the way back to check what T is in the class containing IsVisible, where as in the last case its readily available in IsVisible method. So I assume third case is easier than the first.

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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

(First case)

The compiler is happy about Do. It can infer the T type easily.

It's not inferring T at all. T is a type parameter for the class:

public class Manager<T> where T : Control, new()

(Second case)

The compiler wants types to be explicitly typed now.

I assume you mean in the Manage code:

Do(t => IsVisible(t))

And that's right. What do you think the type of T should be here? How would you expect the complier to infer it?

(Third case, where the method is IsVisible(Control t))

Why doesn't compiler infer T in the last case?

It can't do so from just the parameters. It sounds like you're expecting it to work out every type for which the body of the lambda expression could work... and type inference simply doesn't work that way. You can easily give the compiler enough information though:

 Do((Control t) => IsVisible(t)); 

More importantly, how different is the last case from the first?

In the first case, T isn't a type parameter for the Do method. The compiler only needs to infer S, which it can do from the return type of the lambda expression. It doesn't need to perform any inference for T, because that's already "known". (It's still generic, but it's not something which needs to be inferred for that method call.) The type of T will need to be supplied when constructing an instance of Manager in the first place, so it's effectively moving that decision.

For all the gory details of type inference, see section 7.5.2 of the C# 4 spec (or the equivalent section in the C# 3 or C# 5 specs). I'd advise a strong cup of coffee first though :)

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Jon excellent answer. The real answer that was enlightening to me was that T is not being inferred in the first case. I know its a bit harsh on compiler to infer type from second case but I do think C# would have been better had it inferred type from the 3rd case. Your work around is welcome. Thanking you –  nawfal Nov 4 '12 at 15:45
    
Jon, dont you think its a weakness of C# that it cant infer type from my 3rd case? Sure a lot of ambiguity would arise in case overloaded IsVisibles, but at least that could lead to ambiguity error at compile time like it does in other cases –  nawfal Nov 4 '12 at 15:48
    
@nawfal: Not really. Given how complicated the type inference rules are already, I wouldn't want to make them any more complicated. If you think you can do a better job, I suggest you just try to write out the rules that would be required for the third case to compile. If you can come up with a formulation which isn't insanely complicated, I'm sure the C# team would love to hear from you. –  Jon Skeet Nov 4 '12 at 15:53
    
Haha, thanks for that :) –  nawfal Nov 4 '12 at 16:03
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