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The following is the most basic way I know of to count transitions in a markov chain and use it to populate a transition matrix:

def increment_counts_in_matrix_from_chain(markov_chain, transition_counts_matrix):
    for i in xrange(1, len(markov_chain)):
        old_state = markov_chain[i - 1]
        new_state = markov_chain[i]
        transition_counts_matrix[old_state, new_state] += 1

I've tried speeding it up in 3 different ways:

1) Using a sparse matrix one-liner based on this Matlab code:

transition_matrix = full(sparse(markov_chain(1:end-1), markov_chain(2:end), 1))

Which in Numpy/SciPy, looks like this:

def get_sparse_counts_matrix(markov_chain, number_of_states):
    return coo_matrix(([1]*(len(markov_chain) - 1), (markov_chain[0:-1], markov_chain[1:])), shape=(number_of_states, number_of_states)) 

And I've tried a couple more Python tweaks, like using zip():

for old_state, new_state in zip(markov_chain[0:-1], markov_chain[1:]):
    transition_counts_matrix[old_state, new_state] += 1 

And Queues:

old_and_new_states_holder = Queue(maxsize=2)
old_and_new_states_holder.put(markov_chain[0])
for new_state in markov_chain[1:]:
    old_and_new_states_holder.put(new_state)
    old_state = old_and_new_states_holder.get()
    transition_counts_matrix[old_state, new_state] += 1

But none of these 3 methods sped things up. In fact, everything but the zip() solution was at least 10X slower than my original solution.

Are there any other solutions worth looking into?



Modified solution for building a transition matrix from lots of chains
The best answer to the above question specifically was DSM's. However, for anyone who wants to populate a transition matrix based on a list of millions of markov chains, the quickest way is this:

def fast_increment_transition_counts_from_chain(markov_chain, transition_counts_matrix):
    flat_coords = numpy.ravel_multi_index((markov_chain[:-1], markov_chain[1:]), transition_counts_matrix.shape)
    transition_counts_matrix.flat += numpy.bincount(flat_coords, minlength=transition_counts_matrix.size)

def get_fake_transitions(markov_chains):
    fake_transitions = []
    for i in xrange(1,len(markov_chains)):
        old_chain = markov_chains[i - 1]
        new_chain = markov_chains[i]
        end_of_old = old_chain[-1]
        beginning_of_new = new_chain[0]
        fake_transitions.append((end_of_old, beginning_of_new))
    return fake_transitions

def decrement_fake_transitions(fake_transitions, counts_matrix):
    for old_state, new_state in fake_transitions:
        counts_matrix[old_state, new_state] -= 1

def fast_get_transition_counts_matrix(markov_chains, number_of_states):
    """50% faster than original, but must store 2 additional slice copies of all markov chains in memory at once.
    You might need to break up the chains into manageable chunks that don't exceed your memory.
    """
    transition_counts_matrix = numpy.zeros([number_of_states, number_of_states])
    fake_transitions = get_fake_transitions(markov_chains)
    markov_chains = list(itertools.chain(*markov_chains))
    fast_increment_transition_counts_from_chain(markov_chains, transition_counts_matrix)
    decrement_fake_transitions(fake_transitions, transition_counts_matrix)
    return transition_counts_matrix
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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

How about something like this, taking advantage of np.bincount? Not super-robust, but functional. [Thanks to @Warren Weckesser for the setup.]

import numpy as np
from collections import Counter

def increment_counts_in_matrix_from_chain(markov_chain, transition_counts_matrix):
    for i in xrange(1, len(markov_chain)):
        old_state = markov_chain[i - 1]
        new_state = markov_chain[i]
        transition_counts_matrix[old_state, new_state] += 1

def using_counter(chain, counts_matrix):
    counts = Counter(zip(chain[:-1], chain[1:]))
    from_, to = zip(*counts.keys())
    counts_matrix[from_, to] = counts.values()

def using_bincount(chain, counts_matrix):
    flat_coords = np.ravel_multi_index((chain[:-1], chain[1:]), counts_matrix.shape)
    counts_matrix.flat = np.bincount(flat_coords, minlength=counts_matrix.size)

def using_bincount_reshape(chain, counts_matrix):
    flat_coords = np.ravel_multi_index((chain[:-1], chain[1:]), counts_matrix.shape)
    return np.bincount(flat_coords, minlength=counts_matrix.size).reshape(counts_matrix.shape)

which gives:

In [373]: t = np.random.randint(0,50, 500)
In [374]: m1 = np.zeros((50,50))
In [375]: m2 = m1.copy()
In [376]: m3 = m1.copy()

In [377]: timeit increment_counts_in_matrix_from_chain(t, m1)
100 loops, best of 3: 2.79 ms per loop

In [378]: timeit using_counter(t, m2)
1000 loops, best of 3: 924 us per loop

In [379]: timeit using_bincount(t, m3)
10000 loops, best of 3: 57.1 us per loop

[edit]

Avoiding flat (at the cost of not working in-place) can save some time for small matrices:

In [80]: timeit using_bincount_reshape(t, m3)
10000 loops, best of 3: 22.3 us per loop
share|improve this answer
    
I'm going to accept this answer, but I want to follow up with an additional question. When I use bincount repeatedly to populate a transition counts matrix based on thousands of markov chains, my original code is still faster. I assume this is because counts_matrix.flat += numpy.bincount(flat_coords, minlength=counts_matrix.size) is slower at updating the counts_matrix than my original code. Thoughts on that? –  some-guy Nov 4 '12 at 16:15
    
Update on this: the fastest solution I found for populating a transition matrix based on tons of markov chains is to merge the chains together one after the other, use bincounts, then get the fake transitions (from the end of one chain to the beginning of the next), then decrement the counts for each fake transition. That solution was about 25% faster than my original. –  some-guy Nov 4 '12 at 16:30
    
@some-guy: feel free to take the best solution you find for your use case, post that as an answer, and accept it. –  DSM Nov 4 '12 at 17:35

Just for kicks, and because I've been wanting to try it out, I applied Numba to your problem. In code, that involves just adding a decorator (although I've made a direct call so I could test the jit variants that numba provides here):

import numpy as np
import numba

def increment_counts_in_matrix_from_chain(markov_chain, transition_counts_matrix):
    for i in xrange(1, len(markov_chain)):
        old_state = markov_chain[i - 1]
        new_state = markov_chain[i]
        transition_counts_matrix[old_state, new_state] += 1

autojit_func = numba.autojit()(increment_counts_in_matrix_from_chain)
jit_func = numba.jit(argtypes=[numba.int64[:,::1],numba.double[:,::1]])(increment_counts_in_matrix_from_chain)

t = np.random.randint(0,50, 500)
m1 = np.zeros((50,50))
m2 = np.zeros((50,50))
m3 = np.zeros((50,50))

And then timings:

In [10]: %timeit increment_counts_in_matrix_from_chain(t,m1)
100 loops, best of 3: 2.38 ms per loop

In [11]: %timeit autojit_func(t,m2)                         

10000 loops, best of 3: 67.5 us per loop

In [12]: %timeit jit_func(t,m3)
100000 loops, best of 3: 4.93 us per loop

The autojit method does some guessing based on runtime inputs, and the jit function has types dictated. You have to be a little careful since numba at these early stages doesn't communicate that there was an error with jit if you pass in the wrong type for an input. It will just spit out an incorrect answer.

That said though, getting a 35x and 485x speed-up without any code change and just adding a call to numba (can be also called as a decorator) is pretty impressive in my book. You could probably get similar results using cython, but it would require a bit more boilerplate and writing a setup.py file.

I also like this solution because the code remains readable and you can write it the way you originally thought about implementing the algorithm.

share|improve this answer
    
Neat! What's the startup cost like? –  DSM Nov 4 '12 at 18:56
1  
@DSM Not sure if this is the best way to time it, but %timeit autojit_func = numba.autojit()(increment_counts_in_matrix_from_chain); autojit_func(t,m2) gives 81 us. When I do something similar for plain jit I get a bunch of garbage collection warnings that I assume screw up the timing. –  JoshAdel Nov 4 '12 at 19:02

Here's a faster method. The idea is to count the number of occurrences of each transition, and use the counts in a vectorized update of the matrix. (I'm assuming that the same transition can occur multiple times in markov_chain.) The Counter class from the collections library is used to count the number of occurrences of each transition.

from collections import Counter

def update_matrix(chain, counts_matrix):
    counts = Counter(zip(chain[:-1], chain[1:]))
    from_, to = zip(*counts.keys())
    counts_matrix[from_, to] += counts.values()

Timing example, in ipython:

In [64]: t = np.random.randint(0,50, 500)

In [65]: m1 = zeros((50,50))

In [66]: m2 = zeros((50,50))

In [67]: %timeit increment_counts_in_matrix_from_chain(t, m1)
1000 loops, best of 3: 895 us per loop

In [68]: %timeit update_matrix(t, m2)
1000 loops, best of 3: 504 us per loop

It's faster, but not orders of magnitude faster. For a real speed up, you might consider implementing this in Cython.

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Ok, few ideas to tamper with, with some slight improvement (at cost of human undestanding)

Let's start with a random vector of integers between 0 and 9 of length 3000:

L = 3000
N = 10
states = array(randint(N),size=L)
transitions = np.zeros((N,N))

Your method, on my machine, has a timeit performance of 11.4 ms.

The first thing for a little improvement is to avoid to read the data twice, storing it in a temporary variable:

old = states[0]
for i in range(1,len(states)):
    new = states[i]
    transitions[new,old]+=1
    old=new

This gives you a ~10% improvement and drops the time to 10.9 ms.

A more involuted approach uses the strides:

def rolling(a, window):
    shape = (a.size - window + 1, window)
    strides = (a.itemsize, a.itemsize)
    return np.lib.stride_tricks.as_strided(a, shape=shape, strides=strides)

state_2 = rolling(states, 2)
for i in range(len(state_2)):
    l,m = state_2[i,0],state_2[i,1]
    transitions[m,l]+=1

The strides allow you to read the consecutive numbers of the array tricking the array to think that the rows start in a different way (ok, it's not well described, but if you take some time to read about strides you will get it) This approach loses performance, going to 12.2 ms, but it is the hallway to trick the system even more. flattening both the transition matrix and the strided array to one dimensional arrays, you can speed up the performance a little more:

transitions = np.zeros(N*N)
state_2 = rolling(states, 2)
state_flat = np.sum(state_2 * array([1,10]),axis=1)
for i in state_flat:
    transitions[i]+=1
transitions.reshape((N,N))

This goes down to 7.75 ms. It's not an order of magnitude, but it's a 30% better anyway :)

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