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Hi,

I am trying to read a string into my code via the args[]-parameter, like I would do in Java. So basically, this is what I want to do:

 - read the String "machine" over launch-parameter
 - go through every letter of that string in a loop
 - while in the loop, check is current letter equals "e"
 - if letter equals "e", replace it with "a"
 - return edited string

This is the best way to phrase my elemental questions to C. So I'd be happy if you won't take this post offensive.

How could I implement that code?

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Lion, alk, WhozCraig, Michael Kohne, Srikanth Venugopalan Mar 5 at 12:46

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Please, what have you tried so far? –  alk Nov 4 '12 at 13:46

3 Answers 3

Here's a solution that (almost) doesn't involve pointers, though you should really learn about pointers if you're going to do even moderately advanced C programming.

void replace_e_with_a(char str[])
{
    int i, len = strlen(str);
    for (i=0; i<len; i++) {
        if (str[i] == e) str[i] = a;
    }
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]){
   int i;
   for (i = 1; i < argc; i++) {
     replace_e_with_a(argv[i]);
     puts(argv[i]);
   }
}
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don't forget the #include! –  didierc Nov 4 '12 at 16:20

Here's something that should work.

#include <stdio.h>

void replace_e_with_a(char * str)
{
    int i;
    if (NULL != str)
      while ('\0' != *str ) {
          if (*str == 'e')
              *str = 'a';
          ++str;
      }
}

int main(int argc, char **argv){
   int i;
   for (i = 1; i < argc; ++i) {
     replace_e_with_a(argv[i]);
     puts(argv[i]);
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Could you explain what the * do in this code? That's something I never saw in programming until now. –  QKL Nov 4 '12 at 15:07
    
Sure, this is called the pointer dereference operator, and you can get a good explanation there. There's an equivalent operator in Pascal (or Delphi) : the ^ postfix operator. –  didierc Nov 4 '12 at 15:15
1  
Don't you mean (while(*str))? You will never hit memory address 0x0 by incrementing str, but you want to stop when you hit a '\0'. –  1'' Nov 4 '12 at 15:22
    
@1" good catch! thanks! –  didierc Nov 4 '12 at 16:18
    
Well, I see what the pointer basically does, but I don't get why you used a pointer at (char * str). Why would'nt char[] str work? –  QKL Nov 5 '12 at 6:32

Here you go:

void replace_e_with_a(char * str)
{
    int i;
    if (!str)
        return;
    for (i = 0; str[i]; i++) {
        if (str[i] == 'e')
            str[i] = 'a';
    }
}

Didn't compile it though.

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I know the * stands for pointer. But I don't really understand what you mean here. –  QKL Nov 4 '12 at 14:06
    
There is no such thing "String" in C. There is "an array of chars", which is "char *". What are you asking? You need to at least know what are "arrays" and "pointers" in C in order to understand the answer. –  kliteyn Nov 4 '12 at 14:35
    
I am asking what the * sign means in char * str. As far as I know, arrays are written like char a[] for instance. –  QKL Nov 4 '12 at 15:05

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