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I write a bash script:

   #!/bin/bash
    function test_echo
    {
        echo $0
        echo $1
        echo $2
        echo $#
    }
    test_echo

I try:

find test.sh -type f -exec test_echo '{}' \;

or

find . -type f -exec `./test.sh {}` \;

but it doesn't work.

I need a way to scan file from a folder (I use find) and for each file call a function ( foo_fonction() ) with in parameter the full path of the file.

 find . -type f -exec foo_fonction '{}' \; 

And how to have the parameter (full path) in the foo_fonction() ?

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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are 2 ways to go about this:

1: You can put either put the function definition as part of your find files script:

(Let's call this find_stuff.sh)

#!/bin/bash

test_echo() {
    echo $0
    echo $1
    echo $2
    echo $#
}

files=$(find $(pwd) -type f)
for f in $files
do
    test_echo "$f"
done

Explanation of what this does:

  • A new shell is spawned to run this script if you do ./find_stuff.sh
  • First it defines the test_echo() function,
  • Then it finds all of the files under the current working directory recursively
  • Note that since we specified $(pwd) as the search directory, which will be an absolute path, the results returned by find will be absolute paths too - as you desired.
  • Then for each of these files, pass its file path to the test_echo function

2: Put the function definition elsewhere, but you still want a find_stuff.sh script:

#!/bin/bash

files=$(find $(pwd) -type f)
for f in $files
do
    ./test.sh "$f"
done

and test.sh should look like this:

#!/bin/bash

test_echo () {
    echo $0
    echo $1
    echo $2
    echo $#
}

test_echo $@

Note the last line test_echo $@ - the $@ part is what you were missing before.

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Thank you so much for your explanation. What's $@ do? –  user1778354 Nov 4 '12 at 16:04
    
$@ contains all variables. –  user1778354 Nov 4 '12 at 16:09
    
@user1778354 That is correct =) It's defensive programming practice to pass all the variables in (more information) so if in the future you run into problems, it's easier to debug. –  sampson-chen Nov 4 '12 at 16:32
    
Your solution is guaranteed to fail for files with spaces in them. –  slhck Jan 18 '13 at 14:49
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Find cannot execute internal commands.

It can execute just commands found on the disk.

The explanation is simple: When the process find starts, it cannot see in the environments of the process that started it (forked by bash in this case) the internal commands.

The process bash passes in the environment of find the $PATH, but does not pass it's internals.

You need to add the function into a file.sh, make this one executable, add the path to the script in $PATH [like "." if the pwd of bash is the same as the place of file.sh], and execute it in these conditions.

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Thank you so much for your explanation. –  user1778354 Nov 4 '12 at 16:06
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