Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Visual Studio keeps saying Use of unassigned variable for iVal and iNumber. Can anyone tell me where I'm going wrong?

This is designed to be a code to ask the user to keep entering integers and adding them up until the user wants to stop. The sum of the integers is then displayed on the console.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace AddFive
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
           int iNumber;
           int iVal;
           int iTotal = 0;

            while (iVal > 0)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Enter number " + iNumber);
                iVal = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());
                iTotal = iTotal + iVal;
            }

            if (iNumber <= 0)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Total = " + iTotal);
                iVal = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());
                iTotal = iTotal + iVal;
            }

            Console.WriteLine("Total = " + iTotal);
            Console.WriteLine();
            Console.WriteLine("Press any key to close");
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
If you compare the lines iTotal and iNumber and iVal the difference would be easy to spot I guess... –  rene Nov 4 '12 at 14:40

6 Answers 6

Assign values to those variables. You need to assign values to local variables before using them

    int iNumber = 0;
    int iVal = 0;

when you wrote while (iVal > 0), the value of iVal has not been set

You can get away with that only with instance/class variable, as they are initialized to default value

public class Program
{
    int i; //this was not implicitly initialized to zero (0)

    public Program()
    {
        int j; //need to initialize this before use

        Console.Write(j);  //this throws "Use of unassigned variable" error
        Console.Write(i);  //this prints 0, the default value
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Visual Studio is correct, you're trying to reference an uninitialized variable.

Try this:

 int iNumber = 0;
 int iVal = 0;

This way, your are initializing the variables to an initial value of 0. The original problem occurs on these lines:

while (iVal > 0) and if (iNumber <= 0)

In which you try to access the variables before giving them a value.

share|improve this answer

In C# you must assign value to variable before use it.

e.g.

 int iNumber = 0;
 int iVal = 0;
share|improve this answer
    
Actually you don't HAVE TO the author only was getting a warning not a compiler error. They could ignore the warning considering the default value of an integer is 0. –  Ramhound Nov 4 '12 at 15:14
    
@Ramhound in this example you received two errors, not warnings. –  kmatyaszek Nov 4 '12 at 15:40

You need to initialize iNumber and iVal. Think about what value they will have the first time through the while loop, in your current code.

share|improve this answer

Your iVal parameter is unassigned in your while loop. you need to give is a value when you initialize it.

share|improve this answer

The issue is as noted in several places that you do not assign a value to iNumber or iVal before you use them the first time (in your while statements). In this particular case it's benign and assigning the default value what change a thing. The error is though appropriate. Historically unassigned variables have been a headache in languages that do allow the use of unassigned variables. Especially in languages that do not initialize a storage location to default value. C# does initialize to a default value in this case but it might still lead to hard to find bugs. The compiler is smart enough to check the path the code takes before reaching a particular use of a local and if you can get there with out assigning a value it will complain. This can help in complex code where the code when read sequentially leads you to think that the local has been assigned but in fact due to conditional logic it's not

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.