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Ive got this code which takes an integer 'n', and a list, then splits the list into 'n' lists.

chunk n xs = chunk' i xs
  where
    chunk' _ [] = []
    chunk' n xs = a : chunk' n b where (a,b) = splitAt n xs
    i = ceiling (fromIntegral (length xs) / fromIntegral n)

And this is an example of how it works:

*Main> chunk 5 [1..10]
[[1,2],[3,4],[5,6],[7,8],[9,10]]

Ive been trying to get this to work with the Data.ByteString library but cant figure it out.

This is the code ive been trying to use.

import qualified Data.ByteString as B
B.readFile "meow.txt" >>= (\x -> return $ chunk 4 x)

And this is the error that it gives me:

<interactive>:402:51:
    Couldn't match expected type `[a10]'
                with actual type `B.ByteString'
    In the second argument of `chunk', namely `x'
    In the second argument of `($)', namely `chunk 4 x'
    In the expression: return $ chunk 4 x

It appears to be a type mismatch problem, im assuming because of the fromIntegral. Is there any way to get the chunk function to accept byte strings?

My goal with this function is to strictly accept a binary file of arbitrary length, then split it into 4 pieces of approximately equal length without losing any of the data in the process.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Byte strings are not lists. You will have to write a separate function.

But it is a simple translation. Assuming you have import qualified Data.ByteString as B, then

chunkBytes :: Int -> B.ByteString -> [B.ByteString]
chunkBytes n xs = chunk' i xs
  where
    chunk' n xs
        | B.null xs = []
        | otherwise = a : chunk' n b where (a,b) = B.splitAt n xs
    i = ceiling (fromIntegral (B.length xs) / fromIntegral n)
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This code still spits out a few errors and doesnt compile: Couldn't match expected type 'B.ByteString' with actual type '[t0]' In the second argument of 'B.splitAt', namely 'xs' In the expression: B.splitAt n xs In a pattern binding: (a, b) = B.splitAt n xs –  Ron Watkins Nov 4 '12 at 15:19
    
My apologies. It is a simple translation, but apparently not so simple that I can get away without checking it. Fixed now. –  dave4420 Nov 4 '12 at 15:32
    
Works perfectly now. –  Ron Watkins Nov 4 '12 at 16:09

Pattern matching is low-level, it strictly uses the value constructors to match it. [] and (:) are values constructor for list type [a]. Bytestrings contructors are different, and usually not very useful for users.

We have seen some interest in a higher level form of matching, based on the shape of the values, for example "traversable" values. But there isn't any implementation yet, as far as I know.

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You could also use the listlike package. It creates an unified API for working with lists, ByteStrings, Text etc. So you could write:

import qualified Data.ListLike as LL

chunk :: (Integral n, LL.ListLike l a) => n -> l -> [l]
chunk n xs = chunk' i xs
  where
    chunk' n xs | LL.null xs = []
                | otherwise = a : chunk' n b where (a,b) = LL.splitAt n xs
    i = ceiling (fromIntegral (LL.length xs) / fromIntegral n)
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ByteString is not a list, so you can't traverse it with Prelude.splitAt, which is exported from Data.List, you should use B.splitAt instead.

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