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Help please to compare two strings and take the difference between them in percent

I had two strings like:

first string:
253.0.0.0,253.0.0.0,253.0.0.0,253.0.0.0,253.0.0.0,253.0.0.0,253.0.0.0,253.0.0.0,253.0.0.0,253.0.0.0,253.0.0.0,253.0.0.0,247.0.0.24,197.0.0.35,189.0.0.98....
second string:
255.255.255.127,255.255.255.127,255.255.255.127,255.255.255.127,255.255.255.127,255.255.255.127,255.255.255.127,255.255.255.127,255.255.255.127....

$first_array = explode(",", $out_string);
$second_array = explode(",", $out_string_1);
$result_array = array_merge(array_diff($first_array, $second_array), array_diff($second_array, $first_array));

$result = implode(",",$result_array);
echo $result;
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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

There are two interesting native functions for this purpose, similar_text() and levenshtein()

Example of similar_text():

$string1 = 'AAAb';
$string2 = 'aaab';

similar_text ( $string1, $string2, $percentege );

echo $percentege . '%'; // Output: 25%

Example of levenshtein():

levenshtein($string1, $string2, 1, 1000, 1000000);

EDIT 1

Considering that the first string always have the same quantity of entries that second string, you can try the below code. I've created two strings for test purpose, second string has two equal entries and 7 different entries in a total of 9.

$first_string = '253.0.0.1,253.0.0.2,253.0.0.3,253.0.0.4,253.0.0.5,253.0.0.6,253.0.0.7,253.0.0.8,253.0.0.9';

$second_string = '253.0.0.1,253.0.0.2,255.255.255.127,255.255.255.128,255.255.255.129,255.255.255.130,255.255.255.131,255.255.255.132,255.255.255.133';

$first_array = explode(',', $first_string);

$second_array = explode(',', $second_string);

$total_entries = count($first_array);

$array_differences = array_diff($first_array, $second_array);

$different_entries = count($array_differences);

$percentage = ( $different_entries / $total_entries ) * 100 ;

echo 'Difference: ' . round($percentage, 2) . '%';
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I admit I thought about them too. ) But considered them not relevant for this specific task, as it's basically about comparing the arrays (of IP addresses, obviously), and not pure strings. –  raina77ow Nov 4 '12 at 15:06
    
@raina77ow, Does the strings have the same quantity of IP addresses? –  Marcio Simao Nov 4 '12 at 15:14
    
its not ip addresses it's a RGBA CODE and they have same quantity –  Bob Dylan Nov 4 '12 at 15:22
    
@VolodyaDaniliv, Please see if my EDIT 1 helps you –  Marcio Simao Nov 4 '12 at 15:54
    
Thank you very much! it works! –  Bob Dylan Nov 4 '12 at 16:08

How about as simple as...

$difference = count($result_array) / count($first_array) * 100;

For example:

$arr1 = array(1, 2, 3, 4);
$arr2 = array(5, 2, 4, 8);
$res  = array_diff($arr1, $arr2); 
printf("%.02f%%", count($res) / count($arr1) * 100);    # 50.00%
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You might interpret "difference" as "percentage change" too, in which case the numerator term would be count($first_array) - count($result_array). –  Gian Nov 4 '12 at 15:02
    
Sure, I assumed it was about the share. –  raina77ow Nov 4 '12 at 15:04
    
your code result is 100%...but two arrays are different –  Bob Dylan Nov 4 '12 at 15:26
    
@VolodyaDaniliv And what's expected if they are different? 0%? –  raina77ow Nov 4 '12 at 15:28
    
I need to know how much the first array differs from the second in percentage –  Bob Dylan Nov 4 '12 at 15:31

The similarity function depends strongly on the context in which will be implemented. Without an explanation of what you want to do with the result of the comparison (i.e. your context) it's almost impossible to give you a similarity function out of the box. Although all of the similarity functions I can think of could be valid, none of them could be suited for your problem.

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