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I have difficulty using malloc and fscanf. I just want to read a file and print out the result using I got a segmentation fault error when I executed this code. I am not sure what I have done wrong. I would be very grateful if someone points out a fix. Here is my code:

#include <stdio.h> 
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(int argc, char* argv[]){
    char* buffer = (char*)malloc(*argv[1]); // Allocate memory 
    if(buffer=NULL) // if *argv[1] is not existed, exit the program    
        exit(1);

    int n = 0;
    FILE* fp=fopen("file.txt","r"); // Open the file
    do {
        buffer[n] =fscanf(fp,"%c",buffer); // read from file until it gets EOF
    } while(buffer[n] != EOF);
    fclose(fp); // Close the file

    printf("%s",buffer); // Print the stored string

    free(buffer); // Return the memory
    return 0;    
}
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What command-line arguments are you running it with? –  1'' Nov 4 '12 at 15:30
    
The expression *argv[1] returns the first character of the string in argv[1], which if it's a digit is a value between 48 ('0') and 57 ('9'). Also, using malloc with a zero size may return a valid pointer. You also assign NULL to buffer in the if statement (difference between = and ==). And the scanf family of functions doesn't return the scanned value, they return the amount of values converted. –  Joachim Pileborg Nov 4 '12 at 15:30
    
You never increment n. Then you probably print past the end of the buffer. –  Beta Nov 4 '12 at 15:30
    
Actually, if argv[1] doesn't exist, you will get a segfault since you don't check whether it exists until after you access it. –  1'' Nov 4 '12 at 15:32
    
char* buffer = (char*)malloc(*argv[1]); // Allocate memory -- what is the point of this line? What do you expect argv[1] to be? –  Joe Nov 4 '12 at 15:32

3 Answers 3

Got it. This:

if(buffer=NULL)

should be this:

if(buffer==NULL)

You're setting buffer to NULL. I'm sure you can see what happens next.

More generally, this code is trying to do several things, and it's full of bugs. You should have tested the different functions separately and worked out those bugs along the way.

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This here seems wrong:

   char* buffer = (char*)malloc(*argv[1]);

The command line argument is a string, but you want a number. You have to convert the string to a number first.

Another problem: In your loop n is never increased, which is why only the first byte of the buffer is written.

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Please find the fixed code and the comments inline:

#include <stdio.h> 
#include <stdlib.h> 

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
  // Add the check if *argv[1] does not exist, exit the program    
  long mem_sz=strtol(argv[1],NULL,10);//Safer to atoi
  char* buffer = (char*)malloc(mem_sz); // properly allocate memory 

  //You missed the == in the NULL check.
  if(buffer==NULL) 
   exit(1);

  int n = 0; 
  FILE* fp=fopen("file.txt","r"); // Open the file
  if (fp == NULL)//Check fp too
   exit(1);

  do 
  { 
    buffer[n++]=fscanf(fp,"%c",buffer);
  } // read from file until it gets EOF and n++
  while(buffer[n-1] != EOF);//Check the last read character

  buffer[n]=0;//Put an end of string, so that printf later will work correct

  fclose(fp); // Close the file
  printf("%s\n",buffer); // Print the stored string
  free(buffer); // Return the memory
  return 0;    
}
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1  
As long as you are giving the full answer you might as well indent well... –  Hogan Nov 4 '12 at 21:04

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