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I need to create a very long string in a program, and have been using String.Format. The problem I am facing is keeping track of all the numbers when you have more than 8-10 parameters.

Is it possible to create some form of overload that will accept a syntax similar to this?

String.Format("You are {age} years old and your last name is {name} ",
{age = "18", name = "Foo"});
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Each upvote was followed by a favorite. –  Dan Abramov Mar 22 '11 at 23:47

4 Answers 4

up vote 68 down vote accepted

How about the following, which works both for anonymous types (the example below), or regular types (domain entities, etc):

static void Main()
{
    string s = Format("You are {age} years old and your last name is {name} ",
        new {age = 18, name = "Foo"});
}

using:

static readonly Regex rePattern = new Regex(
    @"(\{+)([^\}]+)(\}+)", RegexOptions.Compiled);
static string Format(string pattern, object template)
{
    if (template == null) throw new ArgumentNullException();
    Type type = template.GetType();
    var cache = new Dictionary<string, string>();
    return rePattern.Replace(pattern, match =>
    {
        int lCount = match.Groups[1].Value.Length,
            rCount = match.Groups[3].Value.Length;
        if ((lCount % 2) != (rCount % 2)) throw new InvalidOperationException("Unbalanced braces");
        string lBrace = lCount == 1 ? "" : new string('{', lCount / 2),
            rBrace = rCount == 1 ? "" : new string('}', rCount / 2);

        string key = match.Groups[2].Value, value;
        if(lCount % 2 == 0) {
            value = key;
        } else {
            if (!cache.TryGetValue(key, out value))
            {
                var prop = type.GetProperty(key);
                if (prop == null)
                {
                    throw new ArgumentException("Not found: " + key, "pattern");
                }
                value = Convert.ToString(prop.GetValue(template, null));
                cache.Add(key, value);
            }
        }
        return lBrace + value + rBrace;
    });
}
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4  
Plus it'll work for domain entities, i.e. Format("Dear {Title} {Forename},...", person) –  Marc Gravell Aug 24 '09 at 12:38
1  
@Preet - C# 3.0, so VS2008 or the .NET 3.5 compiler, but fine targetting .NET 2.0 –  Marc Gravell Aug 24 '09 at 12:39
1  
thank you. It's a lovely bit of language usage! –  Preet Sangha Aug 24 '09 at 12:41
1  
@Jason - that is a circular argument; if you have code that chooses to format (and hence output) sensitive data, then it doesn't matter what approach you use to do it... –  Marc Gravell Aug 24 '09 at 14:03
2  
Fixed it for you... –  Marc Gravell Oct 9 '09 at 11:24

not quite the same but sort of spoofing it... use an extension method, a dictionary and a little code:

something like this...

  public static class Extensions {

        public static string FormatX(this string format, params KeyValuePair<string, object> []  values) {
            string res = format;
            foreach (KeyValuePair<string, object> kvp in values) {
                res = res.Replace(string.Format("{0}", kvp.Key), kvp.Value.ToString());
            }
            return res;
        }

    }
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1  
Extension method does not work, String.Format is static. But you can just create a new static method. –  Stefan Steinegger Aug 24 '09 at 12:28
    
sure you're right! Just another top of my head go... –  Preet Sangha Aug 24 '09 at 12:39

What about if age/name is an variable in your application. So you would need a sort syntax to make it almost unique like {age_1}?

If you have trouble with 8-10 parameters: why don't use

"You are " + age + " years old and your last name is " + name + "
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the simplicity and willingness to buck the string.Format requirement in the original question. Though i do like Marc Gravell's solution. –  Paul Sasik Aug 24 '09 at 13:54
    
In my simple example, you could, but when you are outputting say, HTML, it gets even harder to read. string test = "<input type=""" + age + """ name=""" + name + """ />"; –  Espo Aug 26 '09 at 7:21
    
so true, it really depends on the usage. Even String.Format with html is crappy to read –  RvdK Aug 26 '09 at 7:49
1  
Absolutely un-localizable! –  Serge - appTranslator Oct 9 '09 at 9:57
1  
yeah but there's no requirement so why bother... Making complex things just to make it possible easier later on, it's just wasting time. –  RvdK Oct 9 '09 at 10:32

primitive implementation:

public static class StringUtility
{
  public static string Format(string pattern, IDictionary<string, object> args)
  {
    StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder(pattern);
    foreach (var arg in args)
    {
      builder.Replace("{" + arg.Key + "}", arg.Value.ToString());
    }
    return builder.ToString();
  }
}

Usage:

StringUtility.Format("You are {age} years old and your last name is {name} ",
  new Dictionary<string, object>() {{"age" = 18, "name" = "Foo"}});

You could also use a anonymous class, but this is much slower because of the reflection you'll need.

For a real implementation you should use regular expression to

  • allow escaping the {}
  • check if there are placeholders that where not replaced, which is most probably a programming error.
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