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I have code that looks like the following:

s/(["\'])(?:\\?+.)*?\1/(my $x = $&) =~ s|^(["\'])(.*src=)([\'"])\/|$1$2$3$1.\\$baseUrl.$1\/|g;$x/ge

Ignoring the last bit (and only leaving the part where the problems occur) the code becomes:

s/(["\'])(?:\\?+.)*?\1/replace-text-here/g

I have tried using both, but I still get the same problem, which is that even though I am using the g modifier, this regex only matches and replaces the first occurrence. If this is a Perl bug, I don't know, but I was using a regex that matches everything between two quotes, and also handles escaped quotes, and I was following this blog post. In my eyes, that regex should match everything between the two quotes, then replace it, then try and find another instance of this pattern, because of the g modifier.

For a bit of background information, I am not using and version declarations, and strict and warnings are turned on, yet no warnings have shown up. My script reads an entire file into a scalar (including newlines) then the regex operates directly on that scalar. It does seem to work on each line individually - just not multiple times on one line. Perl version 5.14.2, running on Cygwin 64-bit. It could be that Cygwin (or the Perl port) is messing something up, but I doubt it.

I also tried another example from that blog post, with atomic groups and possessive quantifiers replaced with equivalent code but without those features, but this problem still plagued me.

Examples:

<?php echo ($watched_dir->getExistsFlag())?"":"<span class='ui-icon-alert'><img src='/css/images/warning-icon.png'></span>"?>
Should become (with the shortened regex):
<?php echo ($watched_dir->getExistsFlag())?replace-text-here:replace-text-here?>
Yet it only becomes:
<?php echo ($watched_dir->getExistsFlag())?replace-text-here:"<span class='ui-icon-alert'><img src='/css/images/warning-icon.png'></span>"?>

<?php echo ($sub->getTarget() != "")?"target=\"".$sub->getTarget()."\"":""; ?>
Should become:
<?php echo ($sub->getTarget() != replace-text-here)?replace-text-here.$sub->getTarget().replace-text-here:replace-text-here; ?>
And as above, only the first occurrence is changed.

(And yes, I do realise that this will spark into some sort of - don't use regex for parsing HTML/PHP. But in this case I think that regex is more appropriate, as I am not looking for context, I am looking for a string (anything within quotes) and performing an operation on that string - which is regex.)

And just a note - these regexes are running in an eval function, and the actual regex is encoded in a single quoted string (which is why the single quotes are escaped). I will try any presented solution directly though to rule out my bad programming.

EDIT: As requested, a short script that presents the problems:

#!/usr/bin/perl -w

use strict;

my $data = "this is the first line, where nothing much happens
but on the second line \"we suddenly have some double quotes\"
and on the third line there are 'single quotes'
but the fourth line has \"double quotes\" AND 'single quotes', but also another \"double quote\"
the fifth line has the interesting one - \"double quoted string 'with embedded singles' AND \\\"escaped doubles\\\"\"
and the sixth is just to say - we need a new line at the end to simulate a properly structured file
";
my $regex = 's/(["\'])(?:\\?+.)*?\1/replaced!/g';
my $regex2 = 's/([\'"]).*?\1/replaced2!/g';

print $data."\n";
$_ = $data; # to make the regex operate on $_, as per the original script
eval($regex);
print $_."\n";
$_ = $data;
eval($regex2);
print $_; # just an example of an eval, but without the fancy possessive quantifiers

This produces the following output for me:

this is the first line, where nothing much happens
but on the second line "we suddenly have some double quotes"
and on the third line there are 'single quotes'
but the fourth line has "double quotes" AND 'single quotes', but also another "double quote"
the fifth line has the interesting one - "double quoted string 'with embedded singles' AND \"escaped doubles\""
and the sixth is just to say - we need a new line at the end to simulate a properly structured file

this is the first line, where nothing much happens
but on the second line "we suddenly have some double quotes"
and on the third line there are 'single quotes'
but the fourth line has "double quotes" AND 'single quotes', but also another "double quote"
the fifth line has the interesting one - "double quoted string 'with embedded singles' AND \"escaped doubles\replaced!
and the sixth is just to say - we need a new line at the end to simulate a properly structured file

this is the first line, where nothing much happens
but on the second line replaced2!
and on the third line there are replaced2!
but the fourth line has replaced2! AND replaced2!, but also another replaced2!
the fifth line has the interesting one - replaced2!escaped doubles\replaced2!
and the sixth is just to say - we need a new line at the end to simulate a properly structured file
share|improve this question
    
It would help to show an example of the data that you are applying this substitution to. Applying your second substitution to q( "aaa" 'bbb' ) results in ` replace-text-here replace-text-here ` which I think is what you intended –  Borodin Nov 4 '12 at 17:00
    
The page you refer to uses (?:\\\1|.)*? rather than (?:\\?+.)*? –  Borodin Nov 4 '12 at 17:07
    
@Borodin That page actually states that that particular regex has 'issues' and to use Edit 2 in practical uses. Edit 2 is my regex. –  Xenopathic Nov 4 '12 at 17:13
    
Ah I see. However you still need to provide us an example of data that doesn't work with your code please –  Borodin Nov 4 '12 at 17:17
1  
don't eval your regexp string because then you will have to perform extra quoting. just put the regexp into a sub if you want to control when it is called: sub regexp { $_[0] =~ s/.../.../ge } then just use regexp($data) when you want to execute the substitution. This will have the same effect as $data =~ s/.../.../ge –  user5402 Nov 4 '12 at 18:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Even within single-quotes, \\ gets processed as \, so this:

my $regex = 's/(["\'])(?:\\?+.)*?\1/replaced!/g';

sets $regex to this:

s/(["'])(?:\?+.)*?\1/replaced!/g

which requires each character in the quoted-string to be preceded by one or more literal question-marks (\?+). Since you don't have lots of question-marks, this effectively means that you're requiring the string to be empty, either "" or ''.

The minimal fix is to add more backslashes:

my $regex = 's/(["\'])(?:\\\\?+.)*?\\1/replaced!/g';

but you really might want to rethink your approach. Do you really need to save the whole regex-replacement command as a string and run it via eval?

share|improve this answer
    
Awesome! Thanks for that. I am saving it as a string because my code splits my file into small segments based on certain criteria, and then runs a certain command (in this case a regex) based on the 'context' of the segment - for example between <?php and ?> is saved as a php context, and the php regex is run on it. In turn, there is an html regex and a js regex. –  Xenopathic Nov 4 '12 at 18:53
    
@Xenopathic: You're welcome! Re: why you're saving it as a string: it sounds like what you're looking for is an anonymous subroutine and/or a subroutine reference. (Google either of those terms, plus "Perl", for details and tutorials.) –  ruakh Nov 4 '12 at 20:02
    
@Xenopathic: then you may want a dispatch table instead –  ysth Nov 4 '12 at 22:10

Update: this:

my $regex = 's/(["\'])(?:\\?+.)*?\1/replaced!/g';

should be:

my $regex = 's/(["\'])(?:\\\\?+.)*?\1/replaced!/g';

since those single quotes there in the assignment turn \\ into \ and you want the regex to end up with \\.

Please boil your problem down to a short script that demonstrates the problem (including input, bad output, eval and all). Taking what you do show and trying it:

use strict;
use warnings;
my $input = <<'END';
<?php echo ($watched_dir->getExistsFlag())?"":"<span class='ui-icon-alert'><img src='/css/images/warning-icon.png'></span>"?>
END

(my $output = $input) =~ s/(["\'])(?:\\?+.)*?\1/replace-text-here/g;
print $input,"becomes\n",$output;

produces for me:

<?php echo ($watched_dir->getExistsFlag())?"":"<span class='ui-icon-alert'><img src='/css/images/warning-icon.png'></span>"?>
becomes
<?php echo ($watched_dir->getExistsFlag())?replace-text-here:replace-text-here?>

as I would expect. What does it do for you?

share|improve this answer
    
Indeed, that produces the correct output. I think it has something to do with my eval - putting my regex in directly produced the correct result - using it in the eval messes it up. –  Xenopathic Nov 4 '12 at 18:20
    
@Xenopathic: Well, your example makes your problem obvious. Updating my answer. –  ysth Nov 4 '12 at 18:30
    
Thanks for the help! The escapes fixed the problem. You were 2 minutes slower than ruakh to reply with the fix, so unfortunately the credit for the answer goes to him. –  Xenopathic Nov 4 '12 at 18:50

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