Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My code snippet is as follows :

public void execute(Parameters params) {
    Long requestType = params.getRequestType();
    // Based on the requestType the name of the project would be different
    getName(requestType); 
    // Same as above
    getDescription(requestType) 
    // Project here is a collection of different requests
    Long projectId = createProject(name, description) 
    RequestContents requestContents = params.getRequestContents();
    for(RequestContent requestcontent : requestcontents) {
        Long requestId = createRequest(name, description, projectId);
        updateRequest(requestId, requestContent1);
    }
    // Based on the  requestType, mail content would differ 
    String mailContent = getMailContent(requestType, projectId) 
    sendMail(mailContent); 
}

The output of functions sendMail, createProject, createRequest depends on the requestType, and so these functions would end up having multiple if-else conditions. What is the right way to model this class, to avoid this ?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

One way would be to create an abstract class AbstractRequest having abstract methods sendMail, createProject etc and then have several concrete subclasses RequestType1 RequestType2 etc each having different implementation of sendMail etc. I guess they call it a Strategy pattern.

share|improve this answer
    
They actually call it polymorphism: sourcemaking.com/refactoring/… –  Peter Bratton Nov 5 '12 at 14:24
    
Instead of the request, I would refactor the class containing the exectue() method above. –  Peter Bratton Nov 5 '12 at 14:25
    
@jordan002 Thanks, patterns are hard for me. So you mean this is not a Strategy pattern? –  Alex Nov 5 '12 at 18:04

Use double dispatch:

public class Sender {

    public void sendMail(RequestType1 requestType, String mailContent) {
        // some impl
    }
    public void sendMail(RequestType2 requestType, String mailContent) {
        // some impl
    }
    public void sendMail(RequestType3 requestType, String mailContent) {
        // some impl
    }
}

then

sender.sendMail(requestType, mailContent);

The actual method invoked is determined at runtime based on the type of the requestType object. Not an "if" in sight.


You could simply implement these methods locally, but that would be confusing and hard to read. Better to split out this concern into a separate class.

share|improve this answer
2  
-1 I would apply simple polymorphism here, not method overloading. I would go for a request interface with methods sendMail, createProject, etc. and a factory that instantiate the correct concrete type based on the parameters. –  ewernli Nov 4 '12 at 17:21
1  
@ewernli in this case, it would be better to write an answer before voting down. –  Luiggi Mendoza Nov 4 '12 at 17:22
1  
@ewernli So that opinion makes this answer "not useful" does it? ("Not useful" is what downvoting is meant to indicate - not that you feel there's a better answer) –  Bohemian Nov 4 '12 at 17:22
    
Are RequestType1, 2, and 3 subclasses of RequestType? –  Bhesh Gurung Nov 4 '12 at 17:23
1  
not very useful without showing how double dispatched is implemented for this case. –  irreputable Nov 4 '12 at 17:35

If the requestType is a finite set of String values, you can create a matching Enum for it.

enum RequestType{
    type1,type2,...;
}

Then, you can transform the if-else to a more compact switch-case:

switch (RequestType.valueOf(requestType)){
    case type1:
        ....
    break;
    case type2:
        ...
    break;
    ...
    default:
}

From the code, requestType is a long, you can directly switch on it:

switch (requestType){
    case type1:
        ....
    break;
    case type2:
        ...
    break;
    ...
    default:
}
share|improve this answer
    
If you are using Java7, you can directly switch on a String without having to pass through an enum; –  thedayofcondor Nov 4 '12 at 17:15
    
The requestType is Long not a String. –  Bhesh Gurung Nov 4 '12 at 17:20

why not put the if-else condition in the execute() method itself and based on that call the other methods and pass the relevant parameters. This way you will be creating generic functions of sendmail, createproject, createrequest.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.