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Coming from Java or Python I am used to making such constructs and normally it "just works". Been discovering C# lately and, other than a few frustrations, find it quite pleasant to work with.

One such frustration is how much I have to hold it's hands through polymorphism constructs (override, virtual, etc).

Here is one such case I have not yet found how to "just make work".

class Polymorphism
{
    public interface IPerson
    {
        String Name { get; set; }
    }

    public class Doctor : IPerson
    {
        public String Name { get; set; }
    }

    public class DoctorGroup
    {
        public IEnumerable<IPerson> Members
        {
            get
            {
                return DoctorMembers;
            }
        }

        public List<Doctor> DoctorMembers { get; set; }
        public DoctorGroup()
        {
            DoctorMembers = new List<Doctor>();
        }
    }
}

Here the DoctorMembers are IPersons, thus I should be able to just return a list of doctors when asked for an IEnumerable of IPerson.

public IEnumerable<IPerson> Members
{
    get
    {
        return DoctorMembers;
    }
}

Yet... the compiler complains... why? What am I missing? Semantically there is nothing wrong with this, most OOP languages I have worked with thus far can digest this without syntactic Pepto-Bismol. Am I missing a keyword to make it obvious to the compiler?

The obvious shortcut here is to LINQ convert all the doctors to IPerson but I fail to see why this is necessary or even desirable.

Anybody can light my lantern?

share|improve this question
    
What complaint do you get? – Bit Nov 4 '12 at 17:12
up vote 10 down vote accepted

This code does compile with C# 4 targeting .NET 4, but wouldn't have compiled in C# 3, which didn't have generic variance.

Basically you want an implicit conversion from IEnumerable<Doctor> to IEnumerable<IPerson>. That's safe, because you can only get values "out" of an IEnumerable<T>... which is why in .NET 4, it's declared as IEnumerable<out T>.

Read more on generic variance for details, and remember that this is only available in C# 4 and upwards.

(If you have to use C# 3 or .NET 3.5, you can use the solution shown by CSharpie... but ideally, upgrade to a more recent version :)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Jon, indeed it does work once I ensured C#4. However it seems that not all generics have been moved to such constructs. For example if I used IOrderedEnumerable in the group of IPerson and performed a Linq OrderBy before returning the doctors I get back to the compile error I had... even in C#4. That said... using IEnnumerable here is clearly the lesser of two "evils"! – Newtopian Nov 4 '12 at 17:22
1  
@Newtopian That's because variance is tricky and not all such conversions (even some which appear "obviously" correct) are safe. Read up on co-, contra- and non-variance and look at some examples (such as why array covariance is wrong). – delnan Nov 4 '12 at 17:33
1  
@Newtopian: Yes, IOrderedEnumerable<T> isn't covariant - see the documentation. It's not immediately clear to me if it could be - I suspect not due to the CreateOrderedEnumerable method. – Jon Skeet Nov 4 '12 at 17:33
    
@delnan I almost never use arrays because of the corner cases they have, being rarely bound by performace requirements I have that luxury. – Newtopian Nov 4 '12 at 17:48
    
@JonSkeet: Thanks, I'll have to dig deeper in *variance, I guess my shortcomming in this case is more of the theoratical nature than missing syntax elements. – Newtopian Nov 4 '12 at 17:49

Try this:

public IEnumerable<IPerson> Members
{
    get
    {
        return DoctorMembers.Cast<IPerson>();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
This was already mentioned and summarily dismissed by the OP. – BoltClock Nov 4 '12 at 17:14
1  
My reply was first. but Jon Skeet's version was way better in detail, I admit ^^ – CSharpie Nov 4 '12 at 17:17
1  
yes, this is what I did hoping I would find a way to do this without casting. I try and stay away from casting anything. I usually interpret casting as an architecture code smell. – Newtopian Nov 4 '12 at 17:24

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