Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here is an example case of what I'm trying to do (it is a "test" case just to illustrate the problem) :

#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>
#include <ratio>

template<int Int, typename Type> 
constexpr Type f(const Type x)
{
    return Int*x;
}

template<class Ratio, typename Type, 
         class = typename std::enable_if<Ratio::den != 0>::type>
constexpr Type f(const Type x)
{
    return (x*Ratio::num)/Ratio::den;
}

template</*An int OR a type*/ Something, typename Type>
constexpr Type g(const Type x)
{
    return f<Something, Type>(x);
}

int main()
{
    std::cout<<f<1>(42.)<<std::endl;
    std::cout<<f<std::kilo>(42.)<<std::endl;
}

As you can see, there are two versions of the f() function : the first one takes an int as a template parameter, and the second one takes a std::ratio. The problem is the following :

I would like to "wrap" this function through g() which can take an int OR a std::ratio as first template parameter and call the good version of f().

How to do that without writing two g() functions ? In other words, what do I have to write instead of /*An int OR a type*/ ?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's how I would do it, but I've changed your interface slightly:

#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>
#include <ratio>

template <typename Type>
constexpr
Type
f(int Int, Type x)
{
    return Int*x;
}

template <std::intmax_t N, std::intmax_t D, typename Type>
constexpr
Type
f(std::ratio<N, D> r, Type x)
{
    // Note use of r.num and r.den instead of N and D leads to
    //   less probability of overflow.  For example if N == 8 
    //   and D == 12, then r.num == 2 and r.den == 3 because
    //   ratio reduces the fraction to lowest terms.
    return x*r.num/r.den;
}

template <class T, class U>
constexpr
typename std::remove_reference<U>::type
g(T&& t, U&& u)
{
    return f(static_cast<T&&>(t), static_cast<U&&>(u));
}

int main()
{
    constexpr auto h = g(1, 42.);
    constexpr auto i = g(std::kilo(), 42.);
    std::cout<< h << std::endl;
    std::cout<< i << std::endl;
}

42
42000

Notes:

  1. I've taken advantage of constexpr to not pass compile-time constants via template parameters (that's what constexpr is for).

  2. g is now just a perfect forwarder. However I was unable to use std::forward because it isn't marked up with constexpr (arguably a defect in C++11). So I dropped down to use static_cast<T&&> instead. Perfect forwarding is a little bit overkill here. But it is a good idiom to be thoroughly familiar with.

share|improve this answer
1  
On your edit: why not name your std::ratio parameter and use r.num and r.den? :) –  Xeo Nov 4 '12 at 19:11
    
@Xeo: Good suggestion, thanks! Done. –  Howard Hinnant Nov 4 '12 at 19:24
1  
Maybe also explain why you specifically use the members and not N and D, and not just have it in the edit history. –  Xeo Nov 4 '12 at 19:28

It is not possible to have a template parameter taking both type and non-type values.

Solution 1:

Overloaded functions.

Solution 2:

You can store values in types. Ex:

template<int n>
struct store_int
{
    static const int num = n;
    static const int den = 1;
};

template<class Ratio, typename Type, 
         class = typename std::enable_if<Ratio::den != 0>::type>
constexpr Type f(const Type x)
{
    return (x*Ratio::num)/Ratio::den;
}

template<typename Something, typename Type>
constexpr Type g(const Type x)
{
    return f<Something, Type>(x);
}

But with this solution you will have to specify g<store_int<42> >(...) instead of g<42>(...)

If the function is small, I advise you to use overloading.

share|improve this answer
    
Solution 2 could just use std::ratio. –  KennyTM Nov 4 '12 at 18:02
    
I agree with you for his example. But there are cases where it might be useful (ex: not std::ratio but another template that requires a lot of parameters). –  Synxis Nov 4 '12 at 18:09

How to do that without writing two g() functions ?

You don't. There is no way in C++ to take either a type or a value of some type, except through overloading.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.