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I'm learning about creating events and creating multi-threaded applications.

The method Thread is called by another class which populates the params with search conditions. A BackgroundWorker is created, performs a search and returns the results to worker_RunWorkerCompleted.

Within worker_RunWorkerCompleted, I want to send the results back to my UI which is subscribing to the Fireendofsearch event.

I'm having trouble understanding why my code below throws the following error

Object reference not set to an instance of an object.

when I fire the event Fireendofsearch

public class BackgroundSearch
{
    public event SearchResultCompleteThreaded Fireendofsearch;
    public EventArgs a = null;
    public delegate void SearchResultCompleteThreaded(object seachresults, EventArgs a);
    internal void Thread(string folder, string parms)
    {
        var Argument = new List<object> { folder, parms };
        var worker = new BackgroundWorker {WorkerReportsProgress = false, WorkerSupportsCancellation = false};
        worker.DoWork += worker_DoWork;          
        worker.RunWorkerCompleted += worker_RunWorkerCompleted;
        worker.RunWorkerAsync(Argument);
    }
    void worker_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
    {
        var passedAugue = e.Argument as List<object>;
        var returnResult = new List<string[]>();
        if (passedAugue != null)
        {
            var result = Directory.GetFiles(passedAugue[0].ToString(), passedAugue[1].ToString(), SearchOption.AllDirectories);
            foreach (string s in result)
            {
                var t = new string[4];
                t[0] = s;
                t[1] = File.GetCreationTime(s).ToString();
                t[2] = File.GetLastAccessTime(s).ToString();
                t[3] = File.GetLastWriteTime(s).ToString();
                returnResult.Add(t);
            }
        }
        if (returnResult.Count != 0)
        {
            e.Result = returnResult;
        }            
    }
    void worker_RunWorkerCompleted(object sender, RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (e.Result != null)
        {
            Fireendofsearch(e.Result, a);
        }
    }
}
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UPDATE: The issue was related to subscription. I was subscribing to the event in the UI thread but this event was raised 'by-proxy' of another class. I.e. The UI called a method in class A, class A then invoked another method in class B. Class B raises the event, not class A. Moving things around I got the result I was looking for, but I can't help think I'm missing something. Why can't I subscribe to event in Class B from the UI that was rasied via class A? –  Damo Nov 4 '12 at 19:29

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Firendofsearch will be null until someone subscribes to it, change your work completed event handler to this to fix it.

void worker_RunWorkerCompleted(object sender, RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e)
{
    if (e.Result != null)
    {
        var friendOfSearch = Fireendofsearch;
        if(friendOfSearch != null)
           friendOfSearch (e.Result, a);
    }
}

The reason I copy it to a variable is if someone in another thread is the last person to unsubscribe between the null check and the raising of the event you will still get the null reference exception, by coping to another variable first it solves that problem.


However I would make some other changes if I where writing it, you are retuning a null EventArgs for some reason and passing the result back as the "Sender" in the traditional event pattern. I would change your code to this

public event EventHandler<FriendOfSearchArgs> FirendsOfSearch;

void worker_RunWorkerCompleted(object sender, RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e)
{
    if (e.Result != null)
    {
        RaiseFriendOfSearch(e.Result);
    }
}

protected virtual void RaiseFriendOfSearch(object result)
{
    var friendOfSearch = FirendsOfSearch;
    if(friendOfSearch != null)
        friendOfSearch(this, new FriendOfSearchArgs(result));
}


public class FriendOfSearchArgs : EventArgs
{
   public FriendOfSearchArgs(object result)
   {
       Result = result;
   }

   public object Result {get; private set;}
}

This was all written in the SO text box so there may be one or two errors.

share|improve this answer

For some reason (Optimization most likely), an event is only instantiated when a first handler method subscribe to it.

You must check for that in your code.

Here's how I usually declare an event:

public event SearchResultCompleteThreaded Fireendofsearch;

private void RaiseFireEndOfSearchEvent(EventArgs e)
{
    if (Fireendofsearch != null)
    {
       Fireendofsearch(this, e);
    }
}

And whenever I need to raise the event, I would just call the helper method instead.

share|improve this answer
    
This is not thread-safe. –  Fyodor Soikin Nov 4 '12 at 17:56
    
Why would it need to be thread safe? It's a simple wrapper around an event. Like if (event != null) event(). If it's null, it would stay null due to a lock, if it had one handler, so not being null, the event is instantiated, even if it has no more subscribers. Unless you set your events to null, this isn't a problem at all. –  Gant Nov 4 '12 at 18:36

"Behind" your public event, there's an implicit private variable of type SearchResultCompleteThreaded. The type SearchResultCompleteThreaded is a delegate type.

In .NET all delegates are "multicast" delegates. That means they have an invocation list (your GetInvocationList() method on SearchResultCompleteThreaded is derived from System.Delegate.GetInvocationList().

Now, in .NET, the invocation list is guaranteed to consist of one or more items (not zero or more). Any delegate type is an immutable type. But if you try to create a new instance by "subtracting away" all members in the invocation list of an existing instance, as in var newDel = oldDel - oldDel; or reuseDel -= reuseDel;, then instead of getting a new instance with a zero-length invocation list, you get a null reference!

The good thing about this is that you don't have to worry about a subtle difference between an "empty" delegate instance (which could otherwise have been permitted) and a null reference. The bad thing about it, is the problem you had above.

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You should check for null before trying to invoke the delegate. And you have to pull it into a separate variable first to avoid threading issues.

var ev = Fireendofsearch;
if ( ev != null ) ev( ... );

I have also found it useful to have an extension method for this case:

public static void Raise ( this EventHandler h, object sender )
{
    if ( h != null) h( sender, EventArgs.Empty );
}

And then:

MyEvent.Raise ( this );
share|improve this answer

Set:

public event SearchResultCompleteThreaded Fireendofsearch =  delegate { };

Needs initialized possibly?

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