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I hate recursion, I can't trace through the code easily, but with trees I don't have a choice.

This is what I've tried so far.

private int evaluate(Node n)
{
    if (n != null)
    {
        if (n.isLeaf())  // n is a node with a number
            return Integer.parseInt(n.element);
        else
        {
            int left = evaluate(n.left);
            int right = evaluate(n.right);
            return calculate(left, n.element, right);
        } //end else
    } //end if
} //end evaluate
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by CrazyCasta, arshajii, kleopatra, Mark, WATTO Studios Nov 5 '12 at 13:35

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
You did well, all you need is a trivial, non-recursive calcilate to complete your exercise. ...And don't forget a return. – dasblinkenlight Nov 4 '12 at 20:37
2  
What is the question? – CrazyCasta Nov 4 '12 at 20:38
    
It would have helped a lot if you also posted the problem you have with your code. It is "Method must return a value". – Marko Topolnik Nov 4 '12 at 20:40
    
The method is returning a value in some cases but compiler don't understand. – Roman C Nov 4 '12 at 20:44
    
I was messing with the calculate function, can't get it to work the way I want to, but I have the return statement in. But is the recursion I'm using sound. I'm pretty new to recursion. – Pat Gallagher Nov 4 '12 at 20:44
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Do you mean:

return calculate(left, n.element, right);

I assume your node is an operation, ie "+", "-" etc.

Your "calculate" has to execute the corresponding operation on the int "left" and "right" and you are done!

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I'm fixing up that method to calculate. I know nothing about recursion, so I'm seeing if this works. – Pat Gallagher Nov 4 '12 at 20:58
    
Thanks, I got my calculate method to work and the recursion is working – Pat Gallagher Nov 4 '12 at 21:15

The method does not provide a valid return for each path. So you need to add return ... at the end of the method. I assumed zero would be appropriate since this path should actually never been visited in your recursion.

private int evaluate(Node n)
{
    if (n != null)
    {
        if (n.isLeaf())  // n is a node with a number
            return Integer.parseInt(n.element);
        else
        {
            int left = evaluate(n.left);
            int right = evaluate(n.right);
            return calculate(left, n.element, right);
        } //end else
    } //end if
    return 0;
} //end evaluate

Apart from this your recursion seems to be in good shape.

share|improve this answer
    
I put that in place, just used 999999 instead of 0. I figure I'm going to be getting 0 as a legitimate answer while I'm debugging, so 999999 serves as a better guide for that. But thanks, I just don't trust myself with recursion, so I'm glad I'm starting to get it right. – Pat Gallagher Nov 4 '12 at 21:16
    
As stated by others you could actually throw an exception. Like i said this path should (in what i understand from your code) never actually be visited by your program. – Rouby Nov 4 '12 at 21:20
    
For the time being, the calculate method has a lot of complexities to it, so for debugging purposes the number works right now – Pat Gallagher Nov 4 '12 at 21:22

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