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I'm trying to parse Presentation MathML and build an AST using ANTLR. I have most of the tags supported and I can build nodes for specific constructs.

I'm having trouble with the operators. On this page;

http://www.w3.org/TR/MathML3/appendixc.html

There is a list of the operators, the form they appear in by default (prefix, infix or postifx) and a priority value, which gives the precedence of the operator.

I could take each operator code and add it to my lexer and then write rules for unary, binary and postfix expression based on the precedence, just like how I would write the expressions for C or some other programming language.

The problem is that the operator tags can contain a 'form' attribute which can take the value 'prefix', 'infix' and 'postfix', which changes the tree structure. I can't see the attributes until the parser stage though.

Additionally a operator tag can contain natural language to act as an operator, so I can't deduce the precedence and thus build a correct tree.

Would it be possible to ignore the operator precedence at the parser stage, just load the expressions in as a list of nodes and then re-write the tree at the semantic stage, using a tree walker? I'd have the attribute values at this stage and I hold a dictionary of known operators and their precedence/priority.

This is a major milestone to my progress because I have to decide what I can do before I continue.

EDIT

I have the following MathML expression...

<math>
<mrow>
<mi>a</mi>
<mo>+</mo>
<mi>b</mi>
<mo>+</mo>
<mi>c</mi>
</mrow>
</math>

I can build two different trees...

enter image description here

or...

enter image description here

The second one encodes the associativity of the '+' operator in the tree, and this is what we usually do for programming languages.

But there are hundreds of operators in the specification and so I would have a very large grammar, and lots of alternatives in my production rules.

Natural language can also be used (Although really shouldn't) for operators...

<math>
<mrow>
<mo>there exists</mo>
<mi>x</mi>
<mo>in</mo>
<mi>S</mi>
</mrow>
</math>

So what I'm asking is what is the best way to go about encoding the operators in the tree. I'm trying to convert presentation MathML to Content MathML so I need to analyse the semantics of the presentation to be able to decide what it means mathematically.

Is there a way to convert the first tree to the second one in a Tree Grammar phase?

EDIT

I have the following MathML and the generated tree...

<math>
<mrow>
<mi>a</mi>
<mo>+</mo>
<mi>b</mi>
<mo>+</mo>
<mi>c</mi>
</mrow>
</math>

enter image description here

Here is a simple tree grammar I want to use to find any MO nodes that are in-between other nodes, e.g. MI...

tree grammar SimpleReWriter;

options 
{
  tokenVocab = MathML;
  ASTLabelType = CommonTree;
  output = AST;
  backtrack = true;
  language = CSharp3;
  filter = true; // use pattern matching
  rewrite = true;
}

topdown:   findInfix; // look for infix operators

findInfix : ^(MROW left=.+ MO right=.+) -> ^(MROW ^(MO $left $right));

My program crashes inside the SimpleReWriter class, with the error message : Operation is not valid due to the current state of the object.

My tree grammar works if there was only a single + between nodes, but when there is a sequence of more than one, it crashes.

share|improve this question
    
@BartKiers, see my edit. Thanks. –  David James Ball Nov 4 '12 at 22:42
1  
I think given the nature of MathML and the fact that you might see any unicode character (or any unicode string really) as operators it is simpler (more understandable) just to parse as in your first example closer to the XML tree structure, and then just do the semantic analysis on the tree for those characters you recognise but I don't know the details of the antlr system. form attributes are very rarely explicit in the markup but inferred from the position in the tree, so an <mo>+</mo> at the start of an mrow would have an implied prefix form for example. –  David Carlisle Nov 6 '12 at 22:36

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