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I am having trouble accessing the individual characters of the binary string to do find out whether they are set or not, what am I doing wrong? Or is there an easier way? Here is my code:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

float BinToDec(const string & bin) {
    short length = bin.length();
    float result = 1.0f;

    const char * str = bin.c_str();

    for (int i = 0; i < length; ++i) {
        if ( &str[i] == "1") cout << "SET" << endl << endl;
        else cout << "NOT SET" << endl << endl;
    }

    return result;
}

int main() {

    string bin = "";

    cout << "Input a binary number: ";
    cin >> bin;

    cout << BinToDec(bin) << endl << endl;

}
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3  
Try if ( str[i] == '1') –  fonZ Nov 4 '12 at 21:24
    
@ Lightness Races in Orbit To me this wasnt worth a full answer as it was just a syntax error. PLUS the answers appeared when i hit enter, check timestamps. –  fonZ Nov 4 '12 at 21:33
    
@JonathanCruz: It's not worth a question as it was just a syntax error, but since here we are, that is the answer to the question and therefore should be and has been written as such! –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 4 '12 at 21:34
    
@Lightness congratulations –  fonZ Nov 4 '12 at 21:35
    
@JonathanCruz: I- er, thanks? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 4 '12 at 21:36
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4 Answers

You can iterate directly on your string bin, no need to get the const char *, also the & operator isn't needed here, since by using [] you're already dereferencing and getting a char (which is why you shouldn't compare it to "1" which is not a char but a string literal)

All in all, I think this would be a better approach:

for (int i = 0; i < length; ++i) {
        if ( bin[i] == '1') 
             cout << "SET" << endl << endl;
        else 
             cout << "NOT SET" << endl << endl;
}

Also, storing the length in a short might work now, but strings longer than the maximum value of short exist, so you should use size_t.

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It's not working for you because:

  • you're sort of trying to obtain a substring to compare with the string "1", but your sub-string will terminate at the end of the input... i.e. probably way past the 1 character.
  • comparing C-strings with == just compares pointer values

Instead, compare just individual characters:

if ( str[i] == '1') cout << "SET" << endl << endl;
//  ^          ^ ^
//  |        character literals are delimited by _single_ quotes
// no `&` required

But I don't understand why you're using .c_str() at all; just operate directly on bin instead of creating this C-string str:

float BinToDec(const string& bin)
{
    size_t length = bin.length();
    float result = 1.0f;

    for (int i = 0; i < length; ++i) {
        if (bin[i] == '1')
           cout << "SET" << endl << endl;
        else
           cout << "NOT SET" << endl << endl;
    }

    return result;
}

I've also corrected the type of length.

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If you're sure you want to do this with C-style strings, change:

if ( &str[i] == "1") cout << "SET" << endl << endl;

To

if ( str[i] == '1') cout << "SET" << endl << endl;

That way you'll compare a single character of str with '1', a literal character (instead of "1" a string containing a 1 character.

You existing code is taking the address of offset i into the c_str(), which is effectively the same as the end of the string starting at character i, and comparing it with literal string "1". Note that you can't do C-style string comparison like this, since it'll compare the underlying pointers.

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Since you are trying to check the value for each character, using single quotes and not double quotes.

float BinToDec(const string & bin) {
    short length = bin.length();
    float result = 1.0f;

    const char * str = bin.c_str();

    char c; 
    for (int i = 0; i < length; ++i) {
        c = str[i];

        // Use single quotes and not double quotes here
        if ( c == '1') cout << "SET" << endl << endl;
        else cout << "NOT SET" << endl << endl;
    }

    return result;
}

That said, I think lccarrasco's way is the right way to do what you are trying to achieve.

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1  
It's preferable for answers to explain a solution, providing code as helpful demonstration rather than sole content. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 4 '12 at 21:28
    
Added the explanation. Will follow the guidelines henceforth. Appreciate the feedback. Thanks. –  Vaibhav Desai Nov 4 '12 at 21:43
    
Oh that's much better - ta :) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 4 '12 at 21:44
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