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The following code list all the invoices, and I just want the oldest invoice from a vendor:

SELECT DISTINCT vendor_name, i.invoice_number AS OLDEST_INVOICE, 
    MIN(i.invoice_date), i.invoice_total
FROM vendors v
JOIN invoices i
ON i.vendor_id = v.vendor_id
GROUP BY vendor_name, invoice_number, invoice_total
ORDER BY MIN(i.invoice_date);
share|improve this question
    
This code list all the invoices, and I just want the oldest invoice from a vendor –  Marc Gordon Nov 4 '12 at 21:21
    
is GROUP BY vendor_name ORDER BY ... what you want? –  Jan Dvorak Nov 4 '12 at 21:22
    
Does your SQL engine support ROW_NUMBER() ? –  pilcrow Nov 4 '12 at 21:27
    
I want to return all the first invoices from each vendor and order by the invoice date without using a correlated subquery –  Marc Gordon Nov 4 '12 at 21:35
    
What database engine? –  pilcrow Nov 4 '12 at 21:37

4 Answers 4

Try this instead:

SELECT DISTINCT 
    v.vendor_name, 
    i.invoice_number AS OLDEST_INVOICE, 
    i2.MinDate, 
    i.invoice_total
FROM vendors v
INNER JOIN invoices i  ON i.vendor_id = v.vendor_id
INNER JOIN
(
    SELECT 
      invoice_number , 
      MIN(i.invoice_date) MinDate
    FROM invoices
    GROUP BY invoice_number
) i2 ON  i.invoice_number = i2.invoice_number
     AND i.invoice_date   = i2.MinDate
ORDER BY i2.MinDate;
share|improve this answer
    
No, I have this code but I want to modify it so it doesn't use a correlated subquery SELECT v.vendor_name, i.invoice_number AS OLDEST_INVOICE, i.invoice_date, i.invoice_total FROM vendors v JOIN invoices i ON i.vendor_id = v.vendor_id AND i.invoice_date = (SELECT MIN(invoice_date) FROM invoices WHERE vendor_id = v.vendor_id) ORDER BY i.invoice_date; –  Marc Gordon Nov 4 '12 at 21:28
    
@MarcGordon - The query I posted in my answer is the same as this query without a correlated subquery. –  Mahmoud Gamal Nov 4 '12 at 21:31
    
It gave me this Error report: SQL Error: ORA-00933: SQL command not properly ended 00933. 00000 - "SQL command not properly ended" –  Marc Gordon Nov 4 '12 at 21:38
    
) i2 it was referring to –  Marc Gordon Nov 4 '12 at 21:39
3  
The sub-query in this answer is not a correlated sub-query. It may not be the correct sub-query, but it isn't a correlated sub-query. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 4 '12 at 22:04

Would not HAVING work here?

SELECT DISTINCT vendor_name, i.invoice_number AS OLDEST_INVOICE, 
    MIN(i.invoice_date), i.invoice_total
FROM vendors v
JOIN invoices i
ON i.vendor_id = v.vendor_id
GROUP BY vendor_name, invoice_number, invoice_total
HAVING i.invoice_date = MIN (i.invoice_date)
ORDER BY MIN(i.invoice_date);
share|improve this answer
    
it's saying an error on the HAVING line –  Marc Gordon Nov 4 '12 at 21:33
    
Sorry, I could not test, since I was to lazy to type in the table definitions. –  wildplasser Nov 4 '12 at 21:36
1  
The technique won't work without a sub-query — and that doesn't actually use a HAVING clause. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 4 '12 at 22:19

Time for TDQD — Test-Driven Query Design

The minimum date for an invoice for each vendor is given by:

SELECT vendor_id, MIN(invoice_date) AS invoice_date
  FROM invoices
 GROUP BY vendor_id

The corresponding minimum invoice number (given that there could have been several invoices sent on the first day that a vendor was invoiced, if invoice_date is a true DATE with no time component; if the DATE includes a time component, the second MIN() is probably unnecessary), is:

SELECT vendor_id, MIN(invoice_number) AS invoice_number
  FROM invoices AS i
  JOIN (SELECT vendor_id, MIN(invoice_date) AS invoice_date
          FROM invoices
         GROUP BY vendor_id
       ) AS j ON j.vendor_id = i.vendor_id AND j.invoice_date = i.invoice_date
 GROUP BY vendor_id

You can join this expression with other tables to suit your query requirements:

SELECT v.*, i.*
  FROM vendors AS v
  JOIN (SELECT vendor_id, MIN(invoice_number) AS invoice_number
          FROM invoices AS i
          JOIN (SELECT vendor_id, MIN(invoice_date) AS invoice_date
                  FROM invoices
                 GROUP BY vendor_id
               ) AS j ON j.vendor_id = i.vendor_id AND j.invoice_date = i.invoice_date
         GROUP BY vendor_id
       ) AS inv_info ON v.vendor_id = inv_info.vendor_id
  JOIN invoices AS i ON i.invoice_number = inv_info.invoice_number

There are undoubtedly other ways to design it. Note that none of these sub-queries are correlated sub-queries.

The TDQD has been purely nominal; no DBMS was troubled with checking whether these queries are syntactically valid, much less return the correct answer. OTOH, it is a standand technique.

If you like listing lots of columns in GROUP BY clauses, you could do without the final join to invoices by having the inv_info sub-query return the relevant invoice columns. I don't like having to write lots of column names out — but if I was worried about performance, I'd measure to see if it made a significant difference.

You might find that there's an OLAP function/query that will do the job notationally quicker.

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Thank you so much –  Marc Gordon Nov 5 '12 at 0:07

We'll use ROW_NUMBER() to "rank" the invoices by date per vendor, and then select only the oldest per vendor:

SELECT vendor_name, invoice_number AS oldest_invoice, invoice_date, invoice_total
  FROM vendors v
 INNER JOIN (SELECT invoices.*,
                    ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY vendor_id ORDER BY invoice_date ASC)
                      AS rn
               FROM invoices) i
       ON i.vendor_id = v.vendor_id
          AND
          i.rn = 1;
share|improve this answer
    
My preference is usually to use Min or Max rather than Row_Number, as it is more memory efficient -- the RDBMS does not have to maintain a ranked list of invoices (in this case) from which it chooses those with the minimum rank, it just has to store the min or max value per window. –  David Aldridge Nov 5 '12 at 13:42
    
@DavidAldridge, what would a partitioned min/max solution look like, assuming that invoice_number doesn't necessarily form an increasing sequence (e.g., 'OCT099' precedes 'NOV001')? –  pilcrow Nov 5 '12 at 13:54
1  
SELECT vendor_name, invoice_number AS oldest_invoice, invoice_date, invoice_total FROM vendors v, (SELECT invoices.*, min(invoice_date) OVER (PARTITION BY vendor_id) min_invoice_date_per_vendor FROM invoices) i where i.vendor_id = v.vendor_id and i.invoice_date = i.min_invoice_date_per_vendor –  David Aldridge Nov 5 '12 at 14:02
    
@DavidAldridge, right and +1. Now, how do you break a tie? (Does oracle make that more memory efficient? At first blush your derived table i still selects every row, it merely appends the MIN() date to each.) –  pilcrow Nov 5 '12 at 14:17
    
If a tie situation was possible then it would probably be best to impose a further order-by on something unique, rather than accept a pseudo-random row, if only so that the issue can be documented. Yes, every row must still be selected, the saving comes from the query execution not having to maintain the numeric ranking for all rows. Actually, maybe I mean CPU saving not memory saving, but as I recall there was a measurable saving when inspecting execution with V$SQL_WORKAREA_ACTIVE. Maybe my memory, ironically, is at fault. –  David Aldridge Nov 5 '12 at 14:25

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