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I have a string with the following text:

:0c4b7fcdffc38322555a9e35c22c9469:Nick:194176015020283762507:

How do I parse the final number? i.e.:

194176015020283762507
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You should first use String.Split() to separate the string by the colon (':') separators. Then access the correct element.

var input = ":0c4b7fcdffc38322555a9e35c22c9469:Nick:194176015020283762507:";
var split = input.Split(':');
var final = split[3];

Note that by default, Split() keeps empty entries. You will have one at the beginning and end, because of the initial and ending colons. You could also use:

var split = input.Split(new[] {':'}, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);
var final = split[2];

which, as the option implies, removes empty entries from the array. So your number would be at index 2 instead of 3.

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Oh god! Thank you! It works! –  user1798736 Nov 4 '12 at 21:57
    
Welcome to StackOverflow! Remember to up-vote any answers that helped, and accept the one that best answers your question. –  Jonathon Reinhart Nov 4 '12 at 21:58
    
There is no overload for Split method, which accepts char and split options. –  Sergey Berezovskiy Nov 4 '12 at 21:58
    
@lazyberezovsky Thanks, fixed. –  Jonathon Reinhart Nov 4 '12 at 22:00
string str = ":0c4b7fcdffc38322555a9e35c22c9469:Nick:194176015020283762507:";
string num = str.Split(':')[3];
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var finalNumber = input.Split(new char[] { ':' }, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries)
                       .Last()

This code will split your input string into strings, separated by : (empty strings are removed from start and end of sequence). And last string is returned, which is your finalNumber.

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