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I can't understand why this doesn't work. I'm trying to display lblstatus when the timer cycle is hit:

-(void) viewDidAppear:(BOOL)animated
{
        [NSTimer scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval:1
                                         target:self
                                       selector:@selector(TimeForPictureCycle)
                                       userInfo:nil
                                        repeats:NO];
}

-(void)TimeForPictureCycle
{
    while(YES)
    {
        [lblStatus setHidden:NO];
        sleep(2);
        [lblStatus setHidden:YES];
        sleep(3);
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
probably a stupid question but its something I frequently overlook, have you set the reference in the XIB/Storyboard to the label? – bennythemink Nov 4 '12 at 22:47
4  
Never call sleep on the main thread! – phix23 Nov 4 '12 at 22:49
    
yes it its attached to IBoutlet and nib, I can setHidden without problems from any event – The Poet Nov 4 '12 at 22:49
4  
Never call UIKit methods from a background thread! – phix23 Nov 4 '12 at 22:51
4  
This is simply going to freeze your app no matter what.. while (YES), sleep? – Martol1ni Nov 4 '12 at 22:52
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your calling sleep() on the main thread, that means after you set your label to hidden that thread pauses and prevents the run loop from continuing thus it's not able to update your UI. Your current code simple blocks your whole application.

What you could do is this:

-(void) viewDidAppear:(BOOL)animated
{
    [super viewDidAppear:animated];
    self.showTimer = [NSTimer scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval:1
                                         target:self
                                       selector:@selector(showLabel)
                                       userInfo:nil
                                        repeats:NO];
}

-(void)showLabel
{ 
    [lblStatus setHidden:NO];
    self.hideTimer = [NSTimer scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval:2
                                         target:self
                                       selector:@selector(hideLabel)
                                       userInfo:nil
                                        repeats:NO];
}

-(void)hideLabel
{        
    [lblStatus setHidden:YES];
    self.showTimer = [NSTimer scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval:3
                                         target:self
                                       selector:@selector(showLabel)
                                       userInfo:nil
                                        repeats:NO];
}


- (void)viewWillDisappear:(BOOL)animated
{
    [super viewWillDisappear:animated];
    [self.showTimer invalidate];
    [self.hideTimer invalidate];
}
share|improve this answer
    
thats better, but it can still cause problems: when viewDidAppear is called multiple times there can be multiple timers. better store the timer in an instance variable, so you can cancel it. – phix23 Nov 4 '12 at 22:56
    
you could also do [self performSelector:@selector(hideLabel) withObject:nil afterDelay:1.0]; instead of using NSTimers – phix23 Nov 4 '12 at 22:59
    
your right, i've updated my answer. I prefer to use NSTimer over performSelector: I don't know a specific reason, it's just a personal preference. – Tobi Nov 4 '12 at 23:00
    
BTW you can also cancel performSelector: [NSObject cancelPreviousPerformRequestsWithTarget:self selector:@selector(hideLabel) object:nil] – phix23 Nov 4 '12 at 23:01
    
I know [[NSRunLoop currentRunLoop] cancelPerformSelector:@selector(hideLabel) target:self argument:nil]; is another way to cancel it. – Tobi Nov 4 '12 at 23:03

You can do it simply with:

-(void)viewDidAppear:(BOOL)animated {
    [lblStatus performSelector:@selector(setHidden:) withObject:0 afterDelay:1];
    [lblStatus performSelector:@selector(setHidden:) withObject:@1 afterDelay:3];
}

I'm not really sure why I can pass 0 as an object, but it works.

share|improve this answer
1  
I like the simplicity, but that only executes once. The code in the question implies that it should run repeatedly. – Tobi Nov 5 '12 at 8:42
    
Btw: you can pass the 0 because in this case it's treated as nil, so it will call [lblStatus setHidden:nil] which then again is treated as [lblStatus setHidden:NO] – Tobi Nov 5 '12 at 8:49

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