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C# - Parse Math Expression
C#, User defined formula

The equation will only use addition, subtraction, multiplication, division operators and will not use brackets. I didn't think it would be so difficult, but I've been thinking about it for hours while trying different things and writing different ideas out.

I thought there might be some way by splitting the string on each of those characters and doing something with the output or by looping through the string character by character and coming up with something, but I'm not clever enough I guess.

Anyways, I'd love to hear other peoples' ideas because I'm stumped. I don't want to use a third-party library of some kind which is what everybody has suggested in old threads that I've been looking at.

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marked as duplicate by McGarnagle, L.B, Servy, Uwe Keim, xxbbcc Nov 5 '12 at 6:10

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
I would write a simple equation parser, as found in an Introduction to Compilers course. I prefer recursive descent, as it's "easy" for this kind of problem and can trivially handle precedence with parenthesis (if desired later). Postfix is super trivial to parse and has no precedence ambiguities (it is stack left->right), but is "less customary" than standard infix. Also related is the "shunting method", although I have never thought it clean or sufficiently easier and a recursive descent. –  user166390 Nov 4 '12 at 23:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

For such simple equations it could be implemented with a split and two loops.

For a string like this: "4+5*6/2-8"

Split on operators, keeping them in the result:

"4", "+", "5", "*", "6", "/", "2", "-", "8"

Loop though the operators and calculate multiplication and division, putting the result back in the list:

"4", "+", "30", "/", "2", "-", "8"
"4", "+", "15", "-", "8"

Loop through the operators again and calculate addition and subtraction this time:

"19", "-", "8"
"11"
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Nice idea, if this is on integers you might want to add another pass so multiplication has a higher precedence than division, so expressions like 5/9*30 come out as a sensible answer and not zero. –  Callum Rogers Nov 4 '12 at 23:16
    
Sorry this is something I was thinking of doing but I have no idea how you add the operators back in the result. I remember in Java you could use the string tokenizer and it would remember the characters it split on for you. Is that possible in C#? –  SIL40 Nov 4 '12 at 23:34
    
Nevermind, I just learned about Regex.Split. Had never seen it before, but it works well to keep the delimiters so I've got it figured out now. Thanks! –  SIL40 Nov 4 '12 at 23:48
1  
@CallumRogers: That would work in some situations, but it would give a completely wrong result in others. For example 2*3/2*2 would evaluate as (2*3)/(2*2) instead of ((2*3)/2)*2 and give 1 rather than 6. –  Guffa Nov 5 '12 at 0:43
    
@Guaffa: +1. I suppose it's all a matter of how you define how to parse the expression. Without brackets there are some expressions that cannot be represented, such as 12/(6/3), in fact the whole expression calculus defined by OP is incomplete because of this. With the extra multiplication pass the calculus is still incomplete but maybe more useful. –  Callum Rogers Nov 5 '12 at 2:50

The easiest way to do that is take advantage of the JIT compiler to evaluate a calculation. Thant's what it's there for. you can even pass in code like Math.Acos(4) to the expression, or "create" a function Acos in the object you are using to allow users not to have to worry about the Math. prefix.

string code = string.Format  // Note: Use "{{" to denote a single "{" 
( 
   "public static class Func{{ public static Acos(double d) { return Math.ACos(d); }
                               public static int func(){{ return {0};}}}}", expression 
);

Also you can include additional namespaces if you need any other functions, but Without any extra functions the code is like this:

using System; 
using System.Reflection; 
using System.CodeDom.Compiler; 

using Microsoft.CSharp; 

class Program 
{ 
   static void Main() 
   { 
      TestExpression("2+1-(3*2)+8/2"); 
      TestExpression("1*2*3*4*5*6"); 
      TestExpression("Invalid expression"); 
   } 

   static void TestExpression(string expression) 
   { 
      try 
      { 
         int result = EvaluateExpression(expression); 
         Console.WriteLine("'" + expression + "' = " + result); 
      } 
      catch (Exception) 
      { 
         Console.WriteLine("Expression is invalid: '" + expression + "'"); 
      } 
    } 

    public static int EvaluateExpression(string expression) 
    { 
      string code = string.Format  // Note: Use "{{" to denote a single "{" 
      ( 
         "public static class Func{{ public static int func(){{ return {0};}}}}", expression 
      ); 

      CompilerResults compilerResults = CompileScript(code); 

      if (compilerResults.Errors.HasErrors) 
      { 
         throw new InvalidOperationException("Expression has a syntax error."); 
      } 

      Assembly assembly = compilerResults.CompiledAssembly; 
      MethodInfo method = assembly.GetType("Func").GetMethod("func"); 

      return (int)method.Invoke(null, null); 
   } 

   public static CompilerResults CompileScript(string source) 
   { 
      CompilerParameters parms = new CompilerParameters(); 

      parms.GenerateExecutable = false; 
      parms.GenerateInMemory = true; 
      parms.IncludeDebugInformation = false; 

      CodeDomProvider compiler = CSharpCodeProvider.CreateProvider("CSharp"); 

      return compiler.CompileAssemblyFromSource(parms, source); 
   } 
} 

The answer was copied from http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/csharpgeneral/thread/abff98e3-93fe-44fa-bfd4-fcfe297dbc43/ for I did not like writing the code myself and thanks to Matthew Watson I didn't have to.

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a) Not The easiest way b) Too costly. –  L.B Nov 4 '12 at 23:35
    
@L.B. The easiest is referring to take into account things like brackets, remainders and such. –  Ferry van den heuvel Nov 4 '12 at 23:52
1  
This is easy: stackoverflow.com/questions/12118077/… –  L.B Nov 4 '12 at 23:55

I prefer Recursive Descent Parsing, as stated in a comment. Here is a very quick partial adaptation in C# of the C example found in the linked Wikipedia article.

I find a simple recursive-descent easier to read than the shunting yard method (notice how recursive descent functions closely match EBNF non-terminal definitions) and more extensible. The following can be trivially adapted to allow for parenthesis or "external" functions.

A more robust implementation would actually support symbol classes and handle invalid grammars more gracefully; once again, trivial to add in such a recursive descent parsing setup. Tokening the input (read: splitting the string and converting numbers to double) is left as an exercise to the reader.

class RecDec {
    St x; // ugly shared state, it's a quick example
    public double eval (params object[] tokens) {
        x = new St(tokens);
        return expression();
    }
    double expression() {
        double res = term();
        string accepted;
        while ((accepted = x.acceptOp(new [] {"+", "-"})) != null) {
            res = accepted == "+"
                ? res + term()
                : res - term();
        }
        return res;
    }
    double term() {
        double res = factor();
        string accepted;
        while ((accepted = x.acceptOp(new [] {"*", "/"})) != null) {
            res = accepted == "*"
                ? res * factor();
                : res / factor();
        }
        return res;
    }
    double factor() {
        var val = x.acceptVal();
        if (val == null) {
            throw new Exception(x.ToString());
        }
        return (double)val;
    }
}

The "state" / token-feader class:

class St {
    IEnumerable<object> src;
    public St (IEnumerable<object> src) {
        this.src = src;
    }
    public object acceptVal () {
        var first = src.FirstOrDefault();
        if (first is double) {
            src = src.Skip(1);
            return first;
        } else {
            return null;
        }
    }
    public string acceptOp (params string[] syms) {
        var first = src.FirstOrDefault();
        if (syms.Contains(first)) {
            src = src.Skip(1);
            return (string)first;
        } else {
            return null;
        }
    }
    public override string ToString () {
        return "[" + string.Join(",", src.ToArray()) + "]";
    }
}

And usage (Dump is a LINQPad extension method, use eval return value as applicable):

void Main()
{
    var rd = new RecDec();
    // Use results - i.e. Remove Dump - if not on LINQPad
    rd.eval(1d, "+", 2d).Dump();
    rd.eval(2d, "*", 1d, "+", 2d, "*", 9d, "/", 4d).Dump();
}
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