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I have been writing a piece of code for my coursework in electromagnetic simulation and I have run into a problem. I decided to do a bit extra by expanding the original calculations to really large meshes of up to 10^8 elements, so now I have to use malloc().

So far, so good, but since I prefer to keep my code in libraries and then compile with the inline option of the compiler, I needed a way to pass information between functions. So, I started using structs to keep track of the parameters of the mesh, as well as the pointer to the array of information. I defined the struct the following way:

typedef struct {
    int    height;
    int    width;
    int    bottom; //position of the bottom node
    unsigned int***  dat_ptr;//the pointer to the array with all the data
    } array_info;

Where the triple pointer to an unsigned int is the pointer to a 2D array. I have to do it this way because otherwise it is passed by value and I cannot change it from within the function.

Now, when I try to allocate memory for the struct with the following function:

void create_array(array_info A)//the function accepts struct of type "array_info" as argument
{
    int i;

    unsigned int** array = malloc(sizeof(*array) * A.height);//creates an array of arrays
    for(i = 0; i<A.height; ++i)
    {
        array[i] = malloc(sizeof(**array) * A.width);//creates an array for each row
    }
    *A.dat_ptr=array;//assigns the position of the array to the input pointer
}

I get a segmentation fault upon executing the operation. I cannot see why: sizeof(*A.dat_ptr) is the same as sizeof(array). Thus, in the worst case I should be getting gibberish somewhere down the line, not in the assignment line, right?

share|improve this question
2  
Why a triple pointer for a 2D array? – Jonathan Leffler Nov 4 '12 at 23:38
    
If I use it as a double pointer, the value of the pointer itself cannot be changed outside the scope of the function. I.e., when I pass the whole structure to another function, i can only edit the contents of the array but not its position in memory, which is exactly what I am trying to do with create_array. – MechaPrime Nov 4 '12 at 23:41
1  
@user1798476: that is incorrect. Pass a ref to the **ptr in... Or better still return the whole struct from the function. – Mitch Wheat Nov 4 '12 at 23:43
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You either need to return the array_info structure (as amended) from the function or (more usually) pass a pointer to the array_info structure into the function so that the changes you make affect the value in the calling function.

typedef struct
{
    int    height;
    int    width;
    int    bottom;
    unsigned int **dat_ptr;  // Double pointer, not triple pointer
} array_info;

void create_array(array_info *A)
{
    unsigned int **array = malloc(sizeof(*array) * A->height);
    for (int i = 0; i < A->height; ++i)
        array[i] = malloc(sizeof(**array) * A->width);
    A->dat_ptr = array;
}

I assume you do some checking on the memory allocations somewhere; the logical place is this function, though. Recovery from a failure part way through is fiddly (but necessary if you are going to return from the function rather than exit from the program).

void create_array(array_info *A)
{
    unsigned int **array = malloc(sizeof(*array) * A->height);
    if (array != 0)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < A->height; ++i)
        {
             if ((array[i] = malloc(sizeof(**array) * A->width)) == 0)
             {
                 for (int j = 0; j < i; j++)
                      free(array[j]);
                 free(array);
                 array = 0;
                 break;
             }
        }
    }
    A->dat_ptr = array;
}

The calling function knows that the function failed if the dat_ptr member is null on return from create_array(). It might be better to provide a success/failure return value.

I'm using C99, so the calling code might be:

array_info array = { .height = 10, .width = 20, .dat_ptr = 0 };
create_array(&array);
if (array->dat_ptr == 0)
    ...error handling...

Note that the code in create_array() might need to check for a null pointer, for negative or zero width or height. I'm not clear what the bottom element should contain, so I left it uninitialized, which gives me half an excuse for using designated initializers. You can also write the initializer quite clearly without using designated initializers.

share|improve this answer
    
+1........................... – Mitch Wheat Nov 4 '12 at 23:45
    
Fantastic! I have no words express my gratitude :) I have been bashing my head against this for hours now... Thank you so much :) – MechaPrime Nov 5 '12 at 0:02

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