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Consider following dataContract class. MyHiddenProperty is an optional DataMember -

[DataContract]
public class CompositeType
{        
    string stringValue = "Hello ";

    [DataMember]
    public string StringValue
    {
        get { return stringValue; }
        set { stringValue = value; }
    }

    [IgnoreDataMember] //for IRestricted
    [DataMember]//for IAllowed
    public string MyHiddenProperty { get; set; }
}

I need to make sure that MyHiddenProperty is exposed only at one endpoint and restricted at other.

For this purpose I have created two distinct Service Contract,

[ServiceContract]
public interface IAllowed
{
    [OperationContract]
    string GetData(int value);

    [OperationContract]
    //would expose MyHiddenProperty
    CompositeType GetDataUsingDataContract(CompositeType composite);

}

[ServiceContract]
public interface IRestricted
{
    [OperationContract]
    string GetData(int value);

    [OperationContract]
    //should not expose MyHiddenProperty
    CompositeType GetDataUsingDataContract(CompositeType composite);

}

With an expection to expose them as follows -

<endpoint address="allowedEndpoint" binding="basicHttpBinding" contract="WcfServiceLibrary1.IAllowed">
  <identity>
    <dns value="localhost" />
  </identity>
</endpoint>
<endpoint address="restrictedEndPoint" binding="basicHttpBinding" contract="WcfServiceLibrary1.IRestricted">
  <identity>
    <dns value="localhost" />
  </identity>
</endpoint>   

I understand WCF Authorization mechanism can helpful to restrict access to a particular operation.

How ever it seems a bit tricky to apply restriction at dataContract level. Can we leverage WCF Extensibility points for this scenario?

share|improve this question
2  
Just create two types, CompositeType, and CompositeTypeWithHiddenProperty (which can be a subclass of CompositeType). Then return instances of the former through the IRestricted endpoint, and instances of the later through IAllowed. –  millimoose Nov 4 '12 at 23:54
    
@millimoose's comment is a good suggestion. You could in theory create a data contract surrogate which would change how the type is serialized depending on the endpoint it's being used at, but that's a lot more work than you need. –  carlosfigueira Nov 5 '12 at 4:09

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