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Possible Duplicate:
ScrollTop really jerky in Chrome

I'm using the following code to get a back to top button and a navigation to fade in once the user scrolls. The problem is its triggering every time you scroll, therefore causing the scrolling to be really jerky. Is there an alternate way to do this, which would maybe trigger the function only once?

    $(function () {
    $(window).scroll(function () {
        if ($(this).scrollTop() > 600) {
            $('#backToTop, #navigation').fadeIn();
        } else {
            $('#backToTop, #navigation').fadeOut();
        }
    });
    }); 

   });
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Sparky, Uwe Keim, stealthyninja, Starx, mttrb Nov 5 '12 at 9:06

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
does show() and hide() suffice? – Jan Dvorak Nov 4 '12 at 23:53
3  
I already tried helping you with this in your other question. Please do not post duplicates. I politely asked you specific questions trying to narrow it down and you never described the goal you were trying to achieve. – Sparky Nov 4 '12 at 23:54
    
it still causes it to be jerky whether its fadein or show – Maxim Siebert Nov 4 '12 at 23:56
1  
@Sparky672... Thats brilliant man! Wonder why this question was asked...again. – VIDesignz Nov 5 '12 at 0:17
1  
@Sparky Its tough answering for newcomers...appreciation is hard to come by these days. – VIDesignz Nov 5 '12 at 0:43

You could implement Ben Alman's jQuery throttle or debounce plugin. Basically this limits your functions to be run only a certain amount of times. The difference between the two is explained on the website:

Well, to put it simply: while throttling limits the execution of a function to no more than once every delay milliseconds, debouncing guarantees that the function will only ever be executed a single time (given a specified threshhold).

share|improve this answer

Maybe set a timeout...

function scrollit(){  
    if ($(this).scrollTop() > 600) {
    $('#backToTop').fadeIn();
    } else {
    $('#backToTop').fadeOut();
    }
     }

var timer;

$(window).scroll(function () {

window.clearTimeout(timer);
timer = window.setTimeout(function(){ scrollit(); }, 2000);

    }); 
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