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I am testing a method with an expected exception. I also need to verify that some cleanup code was called (on a mocked object) after the exception is thrown, but it looks like that verification is being ignored. Here is the code. I am using the Junit ExpectedException Rule to verify the expected exception.

@Rule
public ExpectedException expectedEx = ExpectedException.none();

@Test
public void testExpectedException()
{
   MockedObject mockObj = mock(MockedObj.class);
   MySubject subject = new MySubject(mockedObj);
   expectedEx.expect(MyException.class);
   expectedEx.expectMessage("My exception message.");
   subject.someMethodThrowingException();
   verify(mockObj).
       someCleanup(eq(...));
}

It seems like the verify is totally being ignored. No matter what method I put in the verify, my test is passing, which is not what I want.

Any idea why thats happenning?

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3 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

There's nothing magic about the way ExpectedException works; when your code throws an exception, it goes up the stack to the nearest try/catch block, which happens to be in the ExpectedException instance (which checks that it is the exception you're expecting). Like with most exceptions not handled within a method, control never returns to the statements in the method after the exception.

Technically, you could put the verifications in a finally block, but that tends to be a bad habit. In any case it would likely swallow the useful ExpectedException message, since it would run before the ExpectedException rule can intercept it.

If you really need to verify state after the exception, on a per-method basis, you can always revert back to this idiom:

@Test
public void testExpectedException()
{
  MockedObject mockObj = mock(MockedObj.class);
  MySubject subject = new MySubject(mockedObj);
  try {
    subject.someMethodThrowingException();
    fail("Expected MyException.");
  } catch (MyException expected) {
    assertEquals("My exception message.", expected.getMessage());
  }
  verify(mockObj).someCleanup(eq(...));
}
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I haven't tried this yet, but in addition to Jeff Bowman's excellent answer, you might have the choice to use the ExpectedException Rule with a try... finally construct, placing your verify statement in the finally block.

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Check my middle paragraph...I think that would work but would swallow the ExpectedException message. Thanks for the compliment though! –  Jeff Bowman Nov 5 '12 at 3:09
    
Missed that -- probably right. –  Kevin Welker Nov 5 '12 at 3:38
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More elegant solution with catch-exception

@Test
public void testExpectedException()
{
    MockedObject mockObj = mock(MockedObject.class);
    MySubject subject = new MySubject(mockObj);

    when(subject).someMethodThrowingException();

    then(caughtException())
            .isInstanceOf(MyException.class)
            .hasMessage("My exception message.");

    verify(mockObj).someCleanup(eq(...));
}
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