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I am working on assignment. I started with the struct:

struct figures_struct
{
    char figure_name[130];
    double figure_coordinates[1000000];
};

When I read name of the figure from the file, I stored it into the struct as follows:

strcpy(figures[i].figure_name,f_name);

Now I have to modify my code and need to use dynamic memory. I did:

struct figures_struct
{
    char figure_name[130];
    double figure_coordinates[100000];
};

struct figures_struct *figures = malloc(size * sizeof(struct figures_struct));

Now, how do I store figure name into my struct? figures[i].figure_name does not seem to be working.

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its helpful if you include what error you see and what else you've tried. –  Doug T. Nov 5 '12 at 0:17
1  
What "does not seem to be working" is supposed to mean? There's nothing wrong with figures[i].figure_name by itself. strcpy(figures[i].figure_name,f_name) will work perfectly fine. –  AndreyT Nov 5 '12 at 0:22
    
The exact same syntax for structure access will work. And both imply your index (i) will never exceed your dimension (size). Does your assignment require that you can grow your allocated number of structs over time, because that is an entirely different question (and answer). –  WhozCraig Nov 5 '12 at 0:26
3  
And you may want to work on that 0% acceptance rate, or you'll soon find few people interested in answering anything you ask. –  WhozCraig Nov 5 '12 at 0:28
    
It's interesting that the structure size shrank by a factor of 10 between the two versions. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 5 '12 at 0:29

2 Answers 2

strcpy(figures[i].figure_name, f_name);

That will still work with pointers(as pointers and arrays are almost interchangeable in C)

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3  
Up until the parenthetical comment, I'd agree. The parenthetical comment (currently 'as pointers and arrays are almost interchangeable in C') is not the reason why that continues to work, and isn't all that accurate as a statement. Pointers and arrays are closely related; they are not interchangeable, especially not at the point where memory is allocated. However, the reason that the strcpy() still works is that figures[i] is still a structure, just as it was before, so the same initialization technique works on the structure. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 5 '12 at 0:33
    
@JonathanLeffler ah my bad, I used the word almost to mean exactly what you're telling me. –  Aniket Nov 5 '12 at 0:36
2  
@JonathanLeffler: Maybe the more appropriate thing to say would be that arrays can be used where pointer rvalues are required. –  Kerrek SB Nov 5 '12 at 0:48

It will work as soon as "i" is less than "size".

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1  
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. –  Jagger Nov 5 '12 at 1:41

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