Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'd like a single command that:

  • ssh's into my server as user foo, using the public keys I have set up
  • executes a mysqldump of some database with the /etc/mysql/debian.cnf defaults-file
  • to stdout, so I can pipe it locally
  • while doing a sudo on the server remotely, because user foo is not allowed to read /etc/mysql/debian.cnf. foo is allowed to sudo bash but not sudo mysqldump.

This is the best I have come up:

echo 'mysqldump --defaults-file=/etc/mysql/debian.cnf dbname' | ssh -t -i keys/id_rsa -l foo example.com sudo bash -s

This ugly beast works, but produces: Pseudo-terminal will not be allocated because stdin is not a terminal., and I really don't like the echo. There must be a better way?

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

ssh -i keys/id_rsa foo@example.com sudo bash -c "'mysqldump --defaults-file=/etc/mysql/debian.cnf dbname'"

This will only work if sudo doesn't need to ask for a password. If it does, you need the -t option to ssh.

Note the double and single quotes. The outer quotes will get taken away by your local shell, and the whole 'mysqldump --defaults-file=/etc/mysql/debian.cnf dbname' string will be passed to ssh as a single argument. Ssh will pass that to the remote sudo, so your remote will see the single quotes. The remote bash needs the single quotes to interpret the part after -c as a single argument.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you explain the quotes-inside-quotes? The outer ones presumably pass one string into the ssh, but what about the inner one? – Johannes Ernst Nov 5 '12 at 3:46
    
(Added explanation to answer) The outer quotes will get taken away by your local shell, and the whole 'mysqldump --defaults-file=/etc/mysql/debian.cnf dbname' string will be passed to ssh as a single argument. Ssh will pass that to the remote sudo, so your remote will see the single quotes. The remote bash needs the single quotes to interpret the part after -c as a single argument. – Gary G Nov 5 '12 at 12:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.