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I have defined a simple private class named SetOb which contains an int and a Set data structure. I have a HashMap in the 'main' method with SetOb as Key and Integer as value. Now as you can see in the main method, when I feed the HashMap with a SetOb instance and then look for an instance with exactly the same value, it returns 'null'. This has happened with me quite a few times before when I use my own defined data structures like SetOb as Key in HashMap. Can someone please point me what am I missing ? Please note that in the constructor of SetOb class, I copy the Set passed as argument.

public class Solution {

    public static Solution sample = new Solution();
    private class SetOb {
        public int last;
        public Set<Integer> st;
        public SetOb(int l , Set<Integer> si ){
            last = l;
            st = new HashSet<Integer>(si);
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Map<SetOb, Integer> m = new HashMap< SetOb, Integer>();
        Set<Integer> a = new HashSet<Integer>();

        for(int i =0; i<10; i++){
            a.add(i);
        }
        SetOb x = sample.new SetOb(100, a);
        SetOb y = sample.new SetOb(100, a);
        m.put(x,500);
        Integer val = m.get(y);
        if(val!= null) System.out.println("Success: " + val);
        else System.out.println("Failure");
    }

}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your x and y are not the same object instances hence contains is not able to match y against x, which ends up not finding the matching key/value in the Map.

If you want the match to succeed, please implement(override) hasCode & equals method in SetOb which will compare the field values.

Sample methods(Eclipse generated) as below:

@Override
public int hashCode() {
    final int prime = 31;
    int result = 1;
    result = prime * result + last;
    result = prime * result + ((st == null) ? 0 : st.hashCode());
    return result;
}

@Override
public boolean equals(Object obj) {
    if (this == obj)
        return true;
    if (obj == null)
        return false;
    if (getClass() != obj.getClass())
        return false;
    SetOb other = (SetOb) obj;
    if (last != other.last)
        return false;
    if (st == null) {
        if (other.st != null)
            return false;
    } else if (!st.equals(other.st))
        return false;
    return true;
}
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Thanks Yogendra, it worked like a charm :) –  Deepak Garg Nov 5 '12 at 3:06

SetOb needs to override the hashCode() and thus the equals() methods.

Hash-based collections use these methods to store (hashCode()) and retrieve (hashCode()) and equals()) your objects.

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The default implementation of hashCode uses object identity to determine the hash code. You will need to implement hashCode (and equals) in your private class if you want value identity. For instance:

private class SetOb {
    public int last;
    public Set<Integer> st;
    public SetOb(int l , Set<Integer> si ){
        last = l;
        st = new HashSet<Integer>(si);
    }
    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object other) {
        if (other.class == SetOb.class) {
            SetOb otherSetOb = (SetOb) other;
            return otherSetOb.last == last && otherSetOb.st.equals(st);
        }
        return false;
    }
    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        return 37 * last + st.hashCode();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
When you said object identity, did you mean identity by reference ? Thanks for the info. –  Deepak Garg Nov 5 '12 at 3:03
    
@DeepakGarg - Exactly. With object identity, two distinct objects are never considered equal (even though they could, in theory have the same hash code). Thus, one cannot substitute for the other as the key to a hash table lookup. –  Ted Hopp Nov 5 '12 at 3:37

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