Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two tables

Table1 with list of users comma separated

Name    UserID
abc     A,B,C,D
def     A,B,C

Table2

Name   UserID
abc    A
abc    B
abc    C
def    A
def    B

I need to find the users that are in table1 for each Name but not in table2 (There won't ever be an instance when a UserID to Name pair is present in table2 but not in table1 as CSV).

The output should be

Name    UserID
abc     D
def     C

I can do this with PHP but is there a way this can be done through a query? I am not sure where to begin in case I'm doing this as a query. Can I parse in MySQL using comma as delimiter?

share|improve this question
3  
You have denormalized data in your database. What I would recommend you to do is to run a PHP script to normalize the data, and save the results in the normalized for in your database. This way, this particular query and all future queries will be much simpler. In general, it's good to avoid comma-separated values stored in database fields. Read more about database normalization here: databases.about.com/od/specificproducts/a/normalization.htm –  Alex Weinstein Nov 5 '12 at 3:42
    
I need to find the users that are in table1 for **each Name** but not in table2. But D in table1 is not in each Name. D is only in abc. Then how does it come in your desired output? –  hims056 Nov 5 '12 at 4:14
    
What I mean is each name UserID pair.. –  Ank Nov 5 '12 at 9:12
    
How many "users" do the comma-separated lists have at maximium? –  ypercube Nov 25 '12 at 14:10
    
Do you, by chance, have a third table with all valid user ids? This would make it a lot easier. –  Kaii Nov 25 '12 at 14:13
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I plugged your test data into a test schema in SQLFiddle and ran the query that follows.

Here's the link to SQLFiddle with the test and positive results: http://sqlfiddle.com/#!2/83dfd/4/0

Here's the query:

SELECT
COALESCE(NORMALIZED_TABLE1.NAME, TABLE2.NAME) AS NAME,
COALESCE(NORMALIZED_TABLE1.USERID, TABLE2.USERID) AS USERID
FROM (
     SELECT NAME,
     SUBSTRING(
          USERID
          FROM CASE
               WHEN INDEX_TABLE.POS = 1 THEN 1
               ELSE INDEX_TABLE.POS + 1
               END
          FOR CASE LOCATE(',', USERID, INDEX_TABLE.POS + 1)
              WHEN 0 THEN CHARACTER_LENGTH(USERID) + 1
              ELSE LOCATE(',', USERID, INDEX_TABLE.POS + 1)
              END
              - CASE
                WHEN INDEX_TABLE.POS = 1 THEN 1
                ELSE INDEX_TABLE.POS + 1
                END
     ) AS USERID
     FROM TABLE1
     INNER JOIN (
          SELECT @rownum:=@rownum+1 POS
          FROM (
             SELECT 0 UNION SELECT 1 UNION SELECT 2 UNION SELECT 3
             UNION SELECT 4 UNION SELECT 5 UNION SELECT 6
             UNION SELECT 7 UNION SELECT 8 UNION SELECT 9
          ) a, (
             SELECT 0 UNION SELECT 1 UNION SELECT 2 UNION SELECT 3
             UNION SELECT 4 UNION SELECT 5 UNION SELECT 6
             UNION SELECT 7 UNION SELECT 8 UNION SELECT 9
          ) b, (
             SELECT 0 UNION SELECT 1 UNION SELECT 2 UNION SELECT 3
             UNION SELECT 4 UNION SELECT 5 UNION SELECT 6
             UNION SELECT 7 UNION SELECT 8 UNION SELECT 9
          ) c, (SELECT @rownum:=0) r
     ) INDEX_TABLE
     ON INDEX_TABLE.POS <= CHAR_LENGTH(TABLE1.USERID)
     AND (
          INDEX_TABLE.POS = 1
          OR SUBSTRING(USERID FROM INDEX_TABLE.POS FOR 1) = ','
     )
) AS NORMALIZED_TABLE1
LEFT OUTER JOIN TABLE2
ON NORMALIZED_TABLE1.NAME = TABLE2.NAME
AND NORMALIZED_TABLE1.USERID = TABLE2.USERID
WHERE TABLE2.NAME IS NULL;

If you have very long column width in table1 you might need to expand the "INDEX_TABLE" subquery. You can copy and paste over it with the code at this link to do so:
http://www.experts-exchange.com/Database/MySQL/A_3573-A-MySQL-Tidbit-Quick-Numbers-Table-Generation.html

share|improve this answer
1  
a full outer join checks for missing data from both tables. I just realized you only have possible missing data from on of them. The same query logic would still work, but you could replace in the above code the full outer join with a right outer join –  JM Hicks Nov 23 '12 at 21:25
    
OR... you could substitute the 'join' syntax and the current where clause with a 'where not exists ( ... )' clause. That would probably be probably the most elegant way to go, might be somewhat faster too. –  JM Hicks Nov 23 '12 at 22:24
    
Since realizing that you didn't want missing results from both tables, it also occurred that this would be much simpler and do just as well. SELECT NAME, USERID FROM TABLE2 WHERE NOT EXISTS ( SELECT 0 FROM TABLE1 WHERE TABLE1.NAME = TABLE2.NAME AND ( TABLE1.USERID LIKE '%, ' + TABLE2.USERID + ',%' OR TABLE1.USERID LIKE TABLE2.USERID + ',%' OR TABLE1.USERID LIKE '%, ' + TABLE2.USERID ) ); –  JM Hicks Nov 25 '12 at 4:31
    
disregard previous comments –  JM Hicks Nov 28 '12 at 8:21
    
I heard edits don't product notifications, but that comments do. Anyway, this one is working for me if you have a chance to take a look at this demo link: sqlfiddle.com/#!2/83dfd/4/0 –  JM Hicks Nov 30 '12 at 13:53
add comment

If you table is fixed (you are wanted to work on those tables) then design a class to read data from them instead of directly saving the set data from those predefined tables; let your object to process the read data live across your application domain to get a full-blown accessibility. :-D

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your reply. I can very well write a PHP script to parse the user column. However I've created a JavaScript/ PHP module that takes in a SQL query as an input and displays the results in an ordered format. I was wondering if there can be a query for this problem that I can fit into my module and directly get the output. I hope it makes sense !! –  Ank Nov 5 '12 at 3:50
    
:-D too mindful. –  Ewr Xcerq Nov 5 '12 at 3:55
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.