Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

It happened on my product env sometimes(most times it is ok). I doubt whether it has something to do with the parameter 'expire_on_commit' in sessionmaker func

@close_session
def func():
    session = DBSession() # scoped_session, thread_local
    m = Model()
    m.content = 'content'
    session.add(m)
    try:
        session.commit()
    except SQLAlchemyError as e:
        session.rollback()
        raise_my_exception()
    return m.id

close_session is a decorator which will do 'DBSession().close()' in 'finally' section. The ObjectDeleteError happens in line "return m.id"

SQLAlchemy Config:

engines = {                                                                        
    'master': create_engine(                                                       
        settings.MASTER_URL, echo=settings.ECHO_SQL, pool_recycle=3600),           
    'slave': create_engine(                                                        
        settings.SLAVE_URL, echo=settings.ECHO_SQL, pool_recycle=3600),            
}                                                                                  


class RoutingSession(Session):                                                     
    def get_bind(self, mapper=None, clause=None):                                  
        #return engines['master']                                                  
        if self._flushing:                                                         
            return engines['master']                                               
        else:                                                                      
            return engines['slave']                                                

DBSession = scoped_session(sessionmaker(class_=RoutingSession))

The ObjectDeletedError doc:

class ObjectDeletedError(sqlalchemy.exc.InvalidRequestError)
 |  A refresh operation failed to retrieve the database
 |  row corresponding to an object's known primary key identity.
 | 
 |  A refresh operation proceeds when an expired attribute is
 |  accessed on an object, or when :meth:`.Query.get` is
 |  used to retrieve an object which is, upon retrieval, detected
 |  as expired.   A SELECT is emitted for the target row
 |  based on primary key; if no row is returned, this
 |  exception is raised.
 | 
 |  The true meaning of this exception is simply that
 |  no row exists for the primary key identifier associated
 |  with a persistent object.   The row may have been
 |  deleted, or in some cases the primary key updated
 |  to a new value, outside of the ORM's management of the target
 |  object.
 |  

Edit: I put "return m.id" after "session.commit()", the ObjectDeletedEror is still raised

@close_session
def func():
    session = DBSession() # scoped_session, thread_local
    m = Model()
    m.content = 'content'
    session.add(m)
    try:
        session.commit()
        return m.id
    except SQLAlchemyError as e:
        session.rollback()
        raise_my_exception()

Edit2:

I changed my RoutingSession to return only master and the errors gone:

class RoutingSession(Session):                                                     
    def get_bind(self, mapper=None, clause=None):                                  
        return engines['master']                                                               

So it must be something related to this master / slave config.

Any idea on how to solve it?

share|improve this question
    
please include all your configuration for sqlalchemy for both your production and development environments. expire_on_commit seems a likely offender but how can we know without seeing what you used? –  Sheena Nov 5 '12 at 16:49
    
i've given the configuration. Same both in pro and dev environment. –  Tallmad Nov 6 '12 at 3:48

2 Answers 2

this error means one of two things:

  1. raise_my_exception() is not actually raising an exception, so during a rollback() the code falls into "return m.id" and the row is not present, as it was rolled back.

  2. a concurrent thread or process is deleting the row, in between the time when you say session.commit() and "return m.id". The data is expired from "m" after a commit so that the next access will retrieve the most recent data for this object from the database, into a new transaction. This would be consistent with your description that "sometimes(most times it is ok)." - a problem that happens only once in a while is often due to concurrency issues.

share|improve this answer
    
1. raise_my_exception() indeed raised exception. 2. the DBSession() is thread local, is it still possible to have concurrency issues? –  Tallmad Nov 7 '12 at 7:29
    
The 'session.commit()' is successful, I do find the insert row in my database when the error happens. –  Tallmad Nov 7 '12 at 7:58
    
any number of other processes or threads can be changing the state of your database at any time, and your current thread is exposed to these changes at the moment your transaction ends. –  zzzeek Nov 7 '12 at 14:45
    
turn on echo='debug' to see all SQL being emitted and all result sets being received. –  zzzeek Nov 7 '12 at 15:08
    
I removed master/slave routing and errors gone, refer to Edit2 –  Tallmad Nov 9 '12 at 8:07

The DBSession is created with the default (expire_on_commit = True). So After committed, when return obj.id, the obj has expired. So session will get the obj from slave database(engines['slave']), but because of the master-slave delay, corresponding record has not been synced to slave.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.